Enn Original News

Monitoring the Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in the Earth
June 16, 2010 11:28 AM - David A Gabel, ENN

Global Warming is caused by several factors such as the release of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. One solution to the problem is to capture the carbon dioxide before it enters the atmosphere, and instead, deposit the CO2 into the ground. However, up to this point, scientists have been unable to effectively track how it might move underground. The desire is to get the CO2 in place and not have it move elsewhere and potentially cause problems. Now, with the advent of Electric Resistance Tomography (ERT), developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), tested by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), and funded by the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, sequestration of greenhouse gases may expand.

Strange and Curious Clouds
June 15, 2010 02:47 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

It is always nice to lie back and look up into the sky and watch the drifting patterns of clouds. However, some clouds are odder or weirder than others. Some were made by nature and some were made accidentally by the actions of man. As turboprop and jet aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground, new research finds. Through this seeding process, they leave behind odd shaped holes or channels in the clouds, which tend to be fascinating to see.

Painting a Wild Picture of North America
June 14, 2010 06:55 PM - Theodora Lamb, TheBigWild.org

"Do something small to save something big". That's The Big Wild's motto. In the world of wilderness conservation, connecting people to their ecological footprint is a big, wild challenge. The Big Wild is a conservation organization founded by Canada’s Mountain Equipment Co-op and the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. We represent conservation campaigns across the country that have reached their tipping point and need public input to help call on political representatives to protect Canada’s wilderness. We connect communities to conservation efforts across the country. What better way to measure how “wild” North America is than with an infographic?

Sunny with Some Spots
June 14, 2010 02:38 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

When observing the Sun, the most obvious visible features are usually its sunspots, which are well defined surface areas that appear darker than their surroundings because of lower temperatures. Sunspots are regions of intense magnetic activity where convection is inhibited by strong magnetic fields, reducing energy transport from the hot interior to the surface. The magnetic field causes strong heating in the corona, forming active regions that are the source of intense solar flares and coronal mass ejections. the number of such spots varies over time generally in a 11 year cycle. Right now the spots are mostly gone for about 2 years which is highly unusual and may portend dramatic solar events to come which will affect the whole earth.

What is Biodiversity?
June 11, 2010 12:24 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

Biodiversity is starting to be become another buzz word like green products and carbon footprint. Biodiversity is the variation of life forms within a given ecosystem or on the entire Earth. Biodiversity is often used as a measure of the health of biological systems. The biodiversity found on Earth today consists of many millions of distinct biological species. The year 2010 has been declared as the International Year of Biodiversity. One of the market instruments to offset environmental damage is sort of biodiversity offsetting, or bio-compensation. Quite simply, if a developer is going to build something that will damage or destroy a habitat of conservation value then they must buy a ”bio-credit’ to compensate for that loss elsewhere.

Chesapeake Bay Acid Affected Oysters
June 10, 2010 02:08 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States. It lies off the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by Maryland and Virginia. In its waters are abundant marine life but the environment is changing. The shells of young oysters in Chesapeake Bay are not getting as thick as they've been in the past, and higher acidity levels seem to be to blame.

The End of Endosulfan
June 9, 2010 05:17 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is taking action to end all uses of the insecticide endosulfan in the United States. Endosulfan, which is used on vegetables, fruits, and cotton, can pose unacceptable neurological and reproductive risks to farm workers and wildlife and can persist in the environment. Endosulfan has been used in agriculture around the world to control insect pests including whiteflys, aphids, leafhoppers, Colorado potato beetles and cabbage worms. It has also seen use in wood preservation, home gardening, and tse-tse fly control, though it is not currently used for public health or residential purposes. India is the world's largest consumer of endosulfan.

Down Deep in the Gulf of Mexico
June 9, 2010 12:51 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

By now most know about the oil gushing out in the Gulf of Mexico. Certainly it is floating on the surface but what is the effect underwater? One way is to measure the relative concentrations of PAHs (Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) independent analysis of water samples collected during the May 22-28 research mission of the University of South Florida’s R/V Weatherbird II confirmed the presence of very low concentrations of subsurface oil and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) at sampling depths ranging from 50 meters to 1,400 meters.

How to Talk Dolphin
June 9, 2010 11:57 AM - Andy Soos, ENN

Humans have their difficulty communicating with each other in the same language. Using a different language multiplies the difficulties ten fold. Now dolphins have their own way of communicating and, at times, seem to vaguely understand humans. The scientific community had thought that whistles were the main sounds made by these mammals, and were unaware of the importance and use of burst pulsed sounds. Researchers from the Bottlenose Dolphin Research Institute (BDRI), based in Sardinia (Italy) have now shown that these sounds are vital to the animals' social life and mirror their behavior.

EPA withdraws rule excluding certain fuels from RCRA regulations
June 8, 2010 03:57 PM - Roger Greenway, ENN

In December 2008, the US EPA excluded certain fuels derived from hazardous secondary materials which, when burned in industrial boilers under specified conditions generated air pollutant emissions comparable to those produced by burning fuel oil in those boilers. The 2008 conditional exclusion provided a regulatory compliance break for industrial facilities that were able to use potentially hazardous secondary materials as fuel in their boilers since they could do so without the burden of full RCRA documentation on the materials burned. They also, of course, saved money on fuel oil, and on disposal costs of the secondary materials if not burned. On June 8th, the agency changed its mind, and determined that these secondary materials that could be used a s fuels need to be classified as hazardous wastes

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