Green Building

Lincoln’s Tomb going green
December 14, 2007 05:09 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

SPRINGFIELD – Geothermal technology will be used to replace the existing heating and cooling systems at Lincoln Tomb State Historic Site in Springfield’s Oak Ridge Cemetery, a move that will reduce energy usage, improve efficiency, protect the historic tomb finishes, and increase comfort for nearly 375,000 people from around the world who visit the 16th President’s final resting place each year.

The Largest Solar Electric System in New England
December 13, 2007 09:30 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

DAYVILLE, Conn. - Furthering its commitment to Environmentally Responsible Initiatives, United Natural Foods, Inc. (NASDAQ:UNFI) along with Solar Works, Inc. and the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund (CCEF), today held a dedication ceremony for the installation of the largest solar electric system in New England. The 550-kilowatt STC solar photovoltaic system from SCHOTT Solar, installed at the Company's state-of- the-art distribution facility in Dayville, CT, is expected to generate approximately 600,000 kilowatt hours of clean energy annually, enough to power more than 67 average New England homes for one year. The system output will avoid over 14 million pounds (over 6,350 metric tons) of carbon dioxide over the 25-year life of the system.

 

Hemp Farmers Appeal Federal Court Decision
December 13, 2007 08:46 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

BISMARCK, N.D. - Two North Dakota farmers, who filed a federal lawsuit in June to end the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's (DEA) ban on commercial hemp farming in the United States filed a notice of appeal today in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit after the court dismissed their case last month.

 

Treasure Island Plan: Most sustainable city on the planet
December 11, 2007 09:35 AM - Lexington Blood, Triple Pundit

Treasure Island, the man-made lump made up of 20 million cubic yards of sea floor soil sandwiched between 287,000 tons of rock and finally glazed over with 50,000 yards of loam.

The island was created for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition and then claimed as a Naval base until it was decommissioned 11 years ago. Since that time the city of San Francisco has been mulling over a re-facing and studying how to redevelop the bleak landscape on the horizon.

 

Following some-odd 300 meetings among officials, engineers, architects and the public, a plan has emerged and it is a bright green one. The task is to create a 13,500-person inhabited “urban oasis” consisting of the latest technology and natural systems that is expected to leave the slightest footprint on Earth!

Nobel winners say science must transcend borders
December 10, 2007 12:05 PM - By Sarah Edmonds, Reuters

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Scientists must break through the boundaries between disciplines and nations to find solutions to some of the great unanswered questions, some of 2007's Nobel prize winners said on Friday.

Grasscrete: Sustainable Urban Drainage Product
December 9, 2007 09:34 AM - Lexington Blood, Triple Pundit

Grasscrete, the green alternative to standard concrete surfaces for parking lots, driveways, and access roads for vehicles or fire trucks. The benefit to Grasscrete for businesses and developers is that it drains at about the same rate as would an ordinary lawn in the same location. The presence of concrete has little effect on the drainage; the soil and the slope are the controlling factors which makes it beneficial for erosion control as well.

Meter, Meter on the Wall: Giving & Taking from a Smarter Grid
December 7, 2007 09:25 AM - , Triple Pundit

Use of, and plans to use, electricity net metering are spreading around the country driven by a pressing need to modernize and upgrade the nation’s electricity grid in the face of forecast increases in demand and an equally urgent drive to reduce carbon dioxide and greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, net metering is a key element of efforts to build a Smart Electrical Grid, which in and of itself may be one of the largest generators of power and cost savings, as well as catalysts for increasing use of renewable energy sources.

More than 35 states currently offer net metering programs. In addition to enabling electricity suppliers to better manage and increase the efficiency of power generation and distribution, net metering is considered to be among the best ways of providing incentives for consumers to invest in renewable energy generation.

Inaction on greener buildings puzzle experts
December 7, 2007 07:09 AM - Reuters

NUSA DUA, Indonesia (Reuters) - Building greener homes and office towers and installing energy-efficient lighting could slash planet-warming carbon emissions, U.N. and industry officials said at climate talks in Bali on Friday.

They said the technology already existed to dramatically cut electricity use for very little cost, and yet it was puzzling that governments, industries and home-owners weren't cashing in on the energy-saving ideas.

"About 40 percent of all energy is consumed in buildings and in construction. This is the incredible fact most people don't realize," said Kaarin Taipale, of the U.N.'s Marrakesh Task Force on Sustainable Buildings and Construction.

LEED Delivers on Predicted Energy Savings
December 6, 2007 10:13 AM - Nadav Malin, BuildingGreen

LEED Delivers on Predicted Energy Savings With its dominant position defining green building in the North American market, the LEED Rating System is a popular target for critics with a wide range of axes to grind, some justified, others less so. One of the more valid concerns is that LEED’s promises of energy savings (and therefore carbon reductions) are just that—promises. With the exception of LEED for Existing Buildings, which looks at actual operations, LEED’s various rating systems assign energy points to buildings based on predictions made during design. How well those predictions hold up in reality has, until now, been subject to conjecture.

Scottish government to review Trump plans
December 4, 2007 03:13 PM - Andrew Hough, Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) - The Scottish government said on Tuesday it would review controversial plans by U.S. tycoon Donald Trump to build a $2 billion golfing development in Scotland after they were rejected by the local council.

It said it was intervening because the project, to build two championship golf courses, around 1,000 homes, a luxury hotel and 36 villas on a pristine stretch of northeast Scotland's coast, was too "important" to be dealt with by the council.

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