Green Building

Green Roofed Gas Stations?
October 12, 2007 08:40 AM - Nick Aster, Triple Pundit

Whether or not a gas station can be LEED certified, I've no idea, but this creative entrepreneur in Port Washington, WI plans to give his gas station a green roofed touch. Not only that, but he plans to build it into a hillside so that the roof becomes the "front yard" of the building higher up the hill (which happens to be his house). That way, not only is he combating drainage and doing away with an "eyesore", he's also differentiating his product.

Iowa’s Earthpark: Rain Forest, Green Hotel And More
October 11, 2007 02:08 PM - Glenn Hasek, Green Lodging News

NEW YORK—Maxon Holdings LLC (Maxon), a leading energy and environmental development company, announced a partnership with Earthpark, North America’s first center for science literacy and the environment. Maxon will provide $10 million of in-kind financial and technical support toward the completion and opening of Earthpark, scheduled to open on Earth Day, 2011. Maxon will give this support through its infrastructure asset financing operations, part of the company’s asset optimization business. Maxon’s contribution will facilitate ongoing support and involvement with educational and research efforts in the areas of global sustainability and restorative living practices.

Linen Options Grow to Include Organic Cotton—What You Should Know
October 11, 2007 01:53 PM - Glenn Hasek, Green Lodging News

When Hotel Terra opens later this year in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, the linens on the beds of the 72-room, six-story eco-boutique property will be made from organic cotton. Even though the sheets and pillow cases will cost about 25 percent more than standard cotton linens, the Terra Resort Group, developer of the new hotel, will gladly pay the premium. Ashley Morgan, corporate director of sustainability for the company, says using organic cotton linens just makes sense.

Morgan believes the extra investment will quickly come back to the company, as travelers reward them for their commitment to health and the environment. Organic linens are healthier to sleep on, she says, because the cotton itself was grown without harmful pesticides. A set of cotton sheets found in most hotels today requires six pounds of pesticides to get the cotton to grow and mature.

November’s California Lodging Expo and Conference to Have Green Theme
October 9, 2007 09:05 AM - Glenn Hasek, Green Lodging News

The California Lodging Expo and Conference will have a green theme next month. The event will be held at the Oakland Marriott City Center from November 6 to 7 and feature four environment-related sessions. The event will also include presentations by the following prominent industry leaders: Niki Leondakis, COO, Kimpton Hotel & Restaurant Group; Nancy Johnson, EVP, Carlson Hotels Worldwide; and Chip Conley, founder & CEO, Joie de Vivre Hospitality.

Columbus Day protest in Denver leads to arrests
October 6, 2007 06:50 PM - Keith Coffman, Reuters

DENVER (Reuters) - About 75 protesters, including American Indian activist Russell Means, were arrested on Saturday after blocking Denver's downtown parade honoring the Italian-born discoverer Christopher Columbus, an event they denounced as "a celebration of genocide."

Police loaded protesters onto buses after they refused orders to disperse. Most will be charged with obstruction of a roadway or disrupting a lawful assembly, Denver Police Lt. Ron Saunier said.

Police delayed the parade's start for more than an hour as they tried to head off confrontations.

American Indian groups and their supporters have disrupted the city's annual Columbus Day parade every year for nearly two decades, leading to clashes with Colorado's Italian-American community over the century-old celebration, the longest-running such commemoration in the United States.

Green Blossom of Pittsburgh
October 5, 2007 12:41 PM - Greg Boulos, Ecological Home Ideas

Pittsburgh, PA - Many environmentally conscious urbanites dream of how great it would be to utilize the untapped flat rooftops that span every urban block in our nation. In Pittsburgh it narrows to one, Ernie Sota, who in the late 1970s proposed to add a biophilic space to the roof of his Victorian-era row house. After buying the building for a mere $8,000 and renovating it with his wife, Jan, Ernie stood before the zoning board and requested four variances to integrate a new type of urban yard into the roof of the building. He was granted his request. By utilizing the flat space as a garden and capturing the heating potential in a greenhouse to supplement the gas furnace, the Sotas were able to reduce their heat bills, grow some of their own food and spend time relaxing in a natural setting above the bustle of the city below.

New Roofing Technology: Strong, Light, Green, Beautiful, Sustainable
October 4, 2007 10:19 AM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

Santa Ana, Calif. – A Santa Ana California company has developed a new green roofing product that is both light and strong and environmentally-sustainable, using advanced engineering polymer materials. The top layer of the roofing product is made from a highly weatherable material called GE Geloy for superior weatherability. This type of material has been used for more than 40 years for outdoor weatherable applications, yet it has never been used in roofing technology until now.   The company, ArmorLite Roofing, developed the new material in cooperation with GE.

Make Hay (and a lot more) While The Sun Shines
October 4, 2007 08:19 AM - MIT

A team of MIT students, faculty and volunteers has taken on the challenge of designing and building a house that relies entirely on solar energy to meet the electricity needs of a typical American family, from drying towels to cooking dinner.  MIT's off-grid home, known as Solar7, is en route to the capital now. Designed and built at MIT on an asphalt lot at the corner of Albany and Portland Streets in Cambridge, Solar7 was broken into modules and sent off by flatbed truck.

U.S. promotes swap to energy-saving light bulbs
October 3, 2007 06:48 PM - Tom Doggett, Reuters

WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday kicked off a campaign to get U.S. consumers to switch to energy-efficient light bulbs as a way of reducing energy spending and greenhouse gas emissions.

The EPA's "Change-a-Light, Change-the-World" bus tour will travel to 10 U.S. cities this month to promote Energy Star light bulbs that use about 75 percent less electricity than standard incandescent light bulbs and last up to 10 times longer.

The government puts the Energy Star label on light bulbs, appliances and other products that save energy.

The agency wants every U.S. household to change at least one traditional bulb to an Energy Star bulb, collectively saving $600 million a year in energy costs and preventing enough greenhouse gas emissions to equal what is spewed from the tailpipes of 800,000 cars.

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