Health

'The Brazilian Zika outbreak could end soon'
November 16, 2017 11:53 AM - German Center for Infection Research

In 2016, news about the Zika virus in Brazil made the headlines in Europe for the first time. With approximately 65 million people affected, it is one of the largest epidemics in the last few years. The Olympics additionally fuelled fears that the virus could spread globally. When the first cases of newborns with microcephaly, i.e. malformations of the brain, were observed in connection to Zika, it became apparent that further research was called for. The DZIF responded to this global challenge and, under the leadership of Jan Felix Drexler, Charité – Universitätsklinikum Berlin, initiated a German alliance project with Brazilian scientists, which investigates the pathogenesis and epidemiology of Zika.

Is that burger bad for your knees?
November 16, 2017 08:27 AM - University of Calgary

One could say that biomedical engineering grad Kelsey Collins is walking in the footsteps of giants.

When Collins started out as a grad student at the University of Calgary’s Human Performance Laboratory, she didn’t know that her path would lead her to a postdoctoral appointment at Washington University in St. Louis — home to no fewer than 17 Nobel laureates in medicine and physiology, and a world-renowned institute for orthopaedic research.

Study Finds People with Certain Blood Types Have Increased Risks of Heart Attack During Periods of High Air Pollution
November 15, 2017 01:13 PM - Jess Gomez

Individuals who have A, B, or AB blood types have an elevated risk of having a heart attack during periods of significant air pollution, compared to those with the O blood type, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute and Brigham Young University.

The new study is unique in that it links increased risk of heart attack associated with small particulate pollution to increased risk of heart attack for people with certain blood types who have coronary artery disease.

Study Finds People with Certain Blood Types Have Increased Risks of Heart Attack During Periods of High Air Pollution
November 15, 2017 01:13 PM - Jess Gomez

Individuals who have A, B, or AB blood types have an elevated risk of having a heart attack during periods of significant air pollution, compared to those with the O blood type, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute and Brigham Young University.

The new study is unique in that it links increased risk of heart attack associated with small particulate pollution to increased risk of heart attack for people with certain blood types who have coronary artery disease.

Artificial sweeteners in groundwater indicate contamination from septic systems
November 15, 2017 11:30 AM - University of Waterloo

The presence of artificial sweeteners in rural groundwater shows evidence for contamination by local septic system wastewater, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found.

CRISPR-carrying nanoparticles edit the genome
November 15, 2017 11:11 AM - Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

In a new study, MIT researchers have developed nanoparticles that can deliver the CRISPR genome-editing system and specifically modify genes in mice. The team used nanoparticles to carry the CRISPR components, eliminating the need to use viruses for delivery.

Defects in cell's 'waste disposal system' linked to Parkinson's
November 14, 2017 10:14 AM - Baylor College of Medicine

An international study has shed new light on the genetic factors associated with Parkinson’s disease, pointing at a group of lysosomal storage disorder genes as potential major contributors to the onset and progression of this common neurodegenerative disorder. The study appears in the journal Brain.

Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease
November 14, 2017 09:46 AM - University of Bath

A simple colour-changing test to detect fluoride in drinking water, devised by researchers at the University of Bath, could in the future prevent the crippling bone disease, skeletal fluorosis, in developing countries such as India and Tanzania.

Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease
November 14, 2017 09:46 AM - University of Bath

A simple colour-changing test to detect fluoride in drinking water, devised by researchers at the University of Bath, could in the future prevent the crippling bone disease, skeletal fluorosis, in developing countries such as India and Tanzania.

Engineering Non-Immune Cells to Kill Cancer Cells
November 13, 2017 12:12 PM - ETH Zurich

T-cells are one of the immune system’s major weapons. They detect the body’s cells infected with a virus and trigger their ablation, effectively killing the virus. T-cells cannot do the same with cancer cells, however, as they do not recognise them as foreign cells and are therefore unable to eliminate them.

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