Massage found to relieve post-surgery pain
December 17, 2007 04:14 PM - Reuters

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Massage can ease pain after surgery and may complement the use of drugs for patients, U.S. researchers said on Monday. In a study of 605 men 64 years and older who had major surgery, 200 received nightly 20-minute back massages for four days. On a scale of 1 to 10, those who got massages reported their pain diminished one level faster than those who did not.

Flexible work schedule may foster healthy habits
December 17, 2007 01:05 PM - Amy Norton, Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who feel they have flexibility in their job schedules tend to have a healthier lifestyle than those with less workplace freedom, new study results suggest. Researchers found that among nearly 3,200 U.S.-based employees of a large pharmaceutical company, those who felt they had the most workplace flexibility were more likely to report healthy habits such as exercising regularly and getting adequate sleep.

Mutation in one gene tied to Lou Gehrig's disease
December 17, 2007 01:04 PM - Reuters

CHICAGO (Reuters) - A mutation in a single gene may raise one's risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also know as Lou Gehrig's disease, by as much as 30 percent, offering a potential new target for drug research, Dutch scientists said on Sunday.

Canada to crack down on unsafe toys, food, drugs
December 17, 2007 01:02 PM - Reuters

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Reacting to a recent series of toy, food and drug recalls, the Canadian government pledged tighter regulations on Monday to try to prevent such problems in the future. "As we head into the holidays, there's growing concern about the safety of the products on the market, and for good reason," Prime Minister Stephen Harper told a news conference at a Salvation Army toy depot.

EU makes sheep and goat tags compulsory by end of '09
December 17, 2007 11:27 AM - Reuters

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - EU ministers agreed on Monday to introduce electronic tags for millions of sheep and goats across the European Union by the end of 2009, part of a strategy to prevent epidemics of contagious diseases like foot-and-mouth. Back in December 2003, the bloc's farm ministers agreed new animal tagging rules to replace a system where only flocks of sheep and herds of goats are tracked when moved from farm to farm, sold at market or sent for slaughter.

H5N1 bird flu hits Benin, home of Voodoo ritual
December 17, 2007 07:15 AM - Reuters

COTONOU (Reuters) - Benin, the home of ritual Voodoo sacrifice, became the latest in a string of West African states to report cases of H5N1 bird flu after laboratory tests confirmed the deadly virus on two poultry farms.

California Stem Cell Agency Comes Under Fire On Transparency
December 16, 2007 02:18 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

SANTA MONICA, Calif. - The California stem cell agency's identification of only 12 research institutions recommended to compete for $260 million in facilities grants makes a mockery of any claim to openness and transparency in the selection process, the Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights (FTCR) said today.

Is Your Yoga Mat Lacking Personality? Toxic?
December 16, 2007 01:47 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

Lakewood, NJ - The ancient practice of yoga has moved one step forward with the introduction of non-toxic, personalized yoga mats. The new product is the brainchild of Gwen Bandes an eco-committed entrepreneur. The company offers all yoga lovers the option to embroider their name, friend's name, or even their pet's name on to an eco friendly yoga mat. Perhaps most importantly the mat is toxin free. It does not contain PVC, lead, or toluene. It's also biodegradable and recyclable.





One dead, five infected with bird flu in Pakistan
December 15, 2007 12:27 PM - Alistair Scrutton, Reuters

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistan has recorded its first human death from bird flu and five other people have been infected with the deadly H5N1 virus, the Health Ministry said on Saturday.

Alcohol sales linked to gang violence
December 14, 2007 11:00 AM - UC Riverside Newswire

Riverside, California - Gang violence that plagues communities throughout the United States may be reduced by enforcing laws that ban the sale of alcohol to underage drinkers, according to researchers at the University of California, Riverside.

Sociologist Robert Nash Parker, co-director of UCR’s Presley Center for Crime and Justice Studies, and sociology graduate students Kate Luther and Lisa Murphy (now an assistant professor of criminal justice at California State Universit, Long Beach) found a link between high rates of gang violence and high densities of alcohol outlets in a study that grew out of a 12-year gang-intervention project in Riverside, a city of more than 290,000 in Inland Southern California.

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