Health

Green tea may cut prostate cancer risk: Japan study
December 19, 2007 09:03 AM - Reuters

TOKYO (Reuters) - Drinking green tea may reduce the risk of advanced prostate cancer, according to a study by researchers at Japan's National Cancer Center. It said men who drank five or more cups a day might halve the risk of developing advanced prostate cancer compared with those who drank less than one cup a day. "This does not mean that people who drink green tea are guaranteed to have reduced risk of advanced prostate cancer," said Norie Kurahashi, a scientist who took part in the study.

Pakistan says no threat of bird flu pandemic
December 19, 2007 08:59 AM - Reuters

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistan said on Wednesday there was no threat of a pandemic from bird flu, as World Health Organization experts visited the country's northwest which reported the first human death from the virus. Pakistani authorities confirmed at the weekend eight human bird flu cases, including the one death, that the WHO said were likely a combination of infections from poultry and limited person to person transmission due to close contact.

China boosts control of sprawling pesticide market
December 19, 2007 01:40 AM - Reuters

BEIJING (Reuters) - China, reeling from a series of scandals over the safety of its food, will pull thousands of pesticides from the shelves to improve regulation of their sale and use, the Agriculture Ministry said on Wednesday. Farmers are faced with some 23,000 products sold under 16,000 names, leaving them unclear as to what they are spraying on their crops and in what quantities.

Mom-and-Pop Toy Store Takes the Lead on Lead
December 18, 2007 07:12 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

NEWTON, Mass. - In light of recent recalls and concerns about toy safety, award-winning toy store Green Planet Kids undertook to test their entire product line for lead, and is offering free screening for toys their customers purchased elsewhere. Green Planet Kids owners Annabelle Ship and John Sanders had their entire toy store tested with a state-of-the-art XRF scanner. "We're not aware of any other toy store in the country that has taken this step to ensure that their products are safe," said Ship. "Our customers were asking questions. We didn't want to trust anyone else in the supply chain. We wanted to witness the testing so that we could respond with confidence to our customers' concerns," said Ship.

Texas vows to attract other carbon-capture plants
December 18, 2007 06:59 PM - Reuters

HOUSTON (Reuters) - A Texas regulator said Tuesday that while the state was not able to land a $1.5 billion "near-zero" emission coal plant, he wants to find ways to attract other projects that seek to capture and store carbon dioxide, a gas blamed for global warming. Mattoon in central Illinois was named Tuesday as the home for the proposed FutureGen coal plant, beating out Jewett and Odessa, Texas, and another Illinois site in a national competition.

Alberta orders Suncor to solve emission problems
December 18, 2007 06:34 PM - Reuters

CALGARY, Alberta (Reuters) - The Alberta government said on Tuesday it ordered Suncor Energy Inc to come up with a plan to cut emissions of deadly hydrogen sulfide at its oil sands operations after several reports of high concentrations this year.

New Biochip Could Replace Animal Testing
December 18, 2007 06:22 PM -

BERKELEY -- With the cosmetics industry facing a European ban on animal testing in 2009, a newly developed biochip could provide the rapid analysis needed to insure that the chemicals in cosmetics are nontoxic to humans.

Many kids may not outgrow cow's milk allergy
December 18, 2007 06:09 PM - Joene Hendry, Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Cow's milk allergy persists longer than previously reported, and the majority of children may retain the sensitivity into school age, study findings suggest. "The old data saying that most milk allergy will be easily outgrown, usually by the age of 3 years, is most likely wrong," Dr. Robert A. Wood, at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, told Reuters Health. He and colleagues found that just 19 percent of children allergic to cow's milk outgrew their allergy by age 4.

Americans want fit finances before fit body: study
December 18, 2007 04:44 PM - Reuters

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - After a year of record mortgage foreclosures and slumping home prices, Americans are more determined to shape up their flabby finances in 2008 than their bodies, according to a study released by Countrywide Bank on Tuesday. Some 67 percent of the 1,002 adults surveyed nationwide said that becoming financially fit is a top New Year's resolution, while 57 percent are committed to becoming physically fit in 2008. "The results of the survey are an indicator that people are finally putting financial health on par with physical health," said clinical psychologist Dr. Melody Alderman in a statement from Countrywide.

Got fleas? Get the vacuum
December 18, 2007 04:25 PM - Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Vacuum cleaners kill fleas just as well as any poison, surprised researchers said on Tuesday. They said a standard vacuum cleaner abuses the fleas so much it kills 96 percent of adult fleas and 100 percent of younger fleas. So no need to worry that a vacuum cleaner bag may turn into a fleabag breeding ground for the pesky, biting creatures, said Glen Needham, associate professor of entomology at Ohio State University. Needham studied the cat flea, or Ctenocephalides felis, the most common type of flea found in households.

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