Health

U.S. breast cancer death rate continues dropping
September 25, 2007 09:59 AM - Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The death rate from breast cancer continues to drop steadily by about 2 percent a year, but black women are not seeing the same benefits as whites, the American Cancer Society said on Tuesday.

The group found that during 2001 through 2004, breast cancer diagnoses fell by an average of 3.7 percent a year -- in part because women stopped taking hormone replacement therapy and in part because fewer got mammograms and therefore were not diagnosed.

Death rates fell by 2 percent during that period.

For women over the age of 50, breast cancer rates fell more sharply, by 4.8 percent a year since 2001, the group said. Breast cancer rates were stable among black women and younger women, the group said.

The berry with punch
September 25, 2007 09:03 AM - Terri Coles -Reuters

All hail the acai, the latest of a variety of trendy fruits that are finding their way into drinks like smoothies, teas and juices, along with the promise of giving your health a boost.

 

A few years ago, pomegranate was suddenly everywhere, but new options like goji berries and mangosteen became popular once the bright red seed-filled fruit went mainstream.

Why are U.S. kids obese? Just look around them
September 25, 2007 09:00 AM - Julie Steenhuysen -Reuters

Tough choices tempt kids at every turn -- whether it is soda in school, junk food ads on TV or the fast-food chain around the corner -- and school policies limiting physical activity only make matters worse, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday. This throng of temptations may explain why childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, they said.

'Healthy' restaurants help make us fat, says a new study
September 25, 2007 08:43 AM - Cornell University, Chronicle

If you're like most, you eat worst at healthy restaurants.  The "health halos" of healthy restaurants often prompt consumers to treat themselves to higher-calorie side dishes, drinks or desserts than when they eat at fast-food restaurants that make no health claims, according to a series of new Cornell studies.

Study: Acupuncture Works for Back Pain
September 25, 2007 07:28 AM - Associated Press

Fake acupuncture works nearly as well as the real thing for low back pain, and either kind performs much better than usual care, German researchers have found. Almost half the patients treated with acupuncture needles felt relief that lasted months. In contrast, only about a quarter of the patients receiving medications and other Western medical treatments felt better.

Radiologists identify early brain marker of Alzheimer's disease
September 25, 2007 07:23 AM - Radiological Society of North America

Researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have found a new marker which may aid in early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in the October issue of Radiology.

Frog deformities blamed on farm and ranch runoff
September 24, 2007 07:49 PM - Will Dunham, Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Horrific deformities in frogs are the result of a cascade of events that starts when nitrogen and phosphorus from farming and ranching bleed into lakes and ponds, researchers said on Monday.

These nutrients from fertilizers and animal waste create dramatic changes in aquatic ecosystems that help a certain type of parasitic flatworm that inflicts these deformities on North American frogs, researchers said.

"You can get five or six extra limbs. You can get no hind limbs. You can get all kinds of really bizarre, sick and twisted stuff," Pieter Johnson, an ecologist and evolutionary biologist at the University of Colorado at Boulder who led the study, said in a telephone interview.

US Arrests 120 In Major Steroids Crackdown
September 24, 2007 05:03 PM - James Vicini, Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - More than 120 individuals have been arrested in the United States on federal charges in the largest steroids crackdown ever, the Justice Department said on Monday.

Department officials said the arrests stemmed from "Operation Raw Deal," a nearly two-year international investigation targeting the illegal manufacturing and trafficking of anabolic steroids and the raw materials, mainly from China, used to make the performance-enhancing drugs.

The investigation also targeted the human growth hormone and the insulin growth factor markets, they said. The U.S. operation coincided with enforcement actions in Mexico, Canada, China, Belgium, Australia, Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Thailand.

Study: Cancer deaths to hit 17 million in 2030
September 24, 2007 04:53 PM - Michael Kahn, Reuters

BARCELONA (Reuters) - Cancer deaths will more than double to 17 million people each year in 2030 with poor countries shouldering the heaviest burden from the disease, the head of the United Nation's cancer agency said on Monday.

An ageing population will bump up cancer rates worldwide in the coming years, especially in developing countries where the number of people who smoke and drink is on the rise, said Peter Boyle, director of the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

And the disease will hit poorer countries harder because of limited health budgets and a lack of treatments such as radiotherapy that can extend people's lives, he told the European Cancer Conference.

 

Lack of sleep may be deadly, research shows
September 24, 2007 11:31 AM - Ben Hirschler, Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) - People who do not get enough sleep are more than twice as likely to die of heart disease, according to a large British study released on Monday.

Although the reasons are unclear, researchers said lack of sleep appeared to be linked to increased blood pressure, which is known to raise the risk of heart attacks and stroke.

A 17-year analysis of 10,000 government workers showed those who cut their sleeping from seven hours a night to five or less faced a 1.7-fold increased risk in mortality from all causes and more than double the risk of cardiovascular death.

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