Health

Sunny with Some Spots
June 14, 2010 02:38 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

When observing the Sun, the most obvious visible features are usually its sunspots, which are well defined surface areas that appear darker than their surroundings because of lower temperatures. Sunspots are regions of intense magnetic activity where convection is inhibited by strong magnetic fields, reducing energy transport from the hot interior to the surface. The magnetic field causes strong heating in the corona, forming active regions that are the source of intense solar flares and coronal mass ejections. the number of such spots varies over time generally in a 11 year cycle. Right now the spots are mostly gone for about 2 years which is highly unusual and may portend dramatic solar events to come which will affect the whole earth.

Green tea extract appears to keep cancer in check in majority of CLL patients
June 14, 2010 08:53 AM - Karl Oestreich, Mayo Clinic

An extract of green tea appears to have clinical activity with low toxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who used it in a phase II clinical trial, say researchers at Mayo Clinic. The findings, presented Monday, June 7, during the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (http://www.asco.org/) (ASCO), are the latest in a series of Mayo studies to show promise for use of the chemical epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) -- the major component of green tea -- in reducing the number of leukemia cells in patients with CLL.

Study: LEED Homes are Not Necessarily Less Toxic
June 14, 2010 08:41 AM - Susie Kim-Carberry

In a new study by Environment and Human Health, Inc. says that the current LEED system provides a false sense of security regarding the health and safety of its certified homes. A study conducted by the Connecticut based health-research non-profit released their results in LEED Certification: Where Energy Efficiency Collides with Human Health, "The purpose of this report is to evaluate the LEED program’s standards that many assume protect human health from environmental hazards within the built environment."

LEED Us Not into Health Problems
June 10, 2010 10:25 AM - BC Upham, Triple Pundit

Weaknesses in the way LEED certification measures adverse health impacts of building materials gives a false impression of the safety of "environmentally friendly" buildings, according to a new study. The study, "LEED Certification: Where Energy Efficiency Collides with Human Health," by non-profit Environment and Human Health, Inc., recommends that LEED certification be measured separately in different categories.

Dangerous lung worms found in people who eat raw crayfish
June 10, 2010 08:59 AM - Judy Martin, Washington University in St. Louis

If you're headed to a freshwater stream this summer and a friend dares you to eat a raw crayfish – don't do it. You could end up in the hospital with a severe parasitic infection. Physicians at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have diagnosed a rare parasitic infection in six people who had consumed raw crayfish from streams and rivers in Missouri. The cases occurred over the past three years, but three have been diagnosed since last September; the latest in April. Before these six, only seven such cases had ever been reported in North America, where the parasite, Paragonimus kellicotti, is common in crayfish.

The End of Endosulfan
June 9, 2010 05:17 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is taking action to end all uses of the insecticide endosulfan in the United States. Endosulfan, which is used on vegetables, fruits, and cotton, can pose unacceptable neurological and reproductive risks to farm workers and wildlife and can persist in the environment. Endosulfan has been used in agriculture around the world to control insect pests including whiteflys, aphids, leafhoppers, Colorado potato beetles and cabbage worms. It has also seen use in wood preservation, home gardening, and tse-tse fly control, though it is not currently used for public health or residential purposes. India is the world's largest consumer of endosulfan.

EPA withdraws rule excluding certain fuels from RCRA regulations
June 8, 2010 03:57 PM - Roger Greenway, ENN

In December 2008, the US EPA excluded certain fuels derived from hazardous secondary materials which, when burned in industrial boilers under specified conditions generated air pollutant emissions comparable to those produced by burning fuel oil in those boilers. The 2008 conditional exclusion provided a regulatory compliance break for industrial facilities that were able to use potentially hazardous secondary materials as fuel in their boilers since they could do so without the burden of full RCRA documentation on the materials burned. They also, of course, saved money on fuel oil, and on disposal costs of the secondary materials if not burned. On June 8th, the agency changed its mind, and determined that these secondary materials that could be used a s fuels need to be classified as hazardous wastes

Indian court convicts seven in Bhopal chemical plant disaster
June 8, 2010 06:50 AM - Editor, Ecologist

A twenty-five year wait for first convictions relating to the gas leak at Bhopal chemical plant in India ends, but the contamination of the local environment and population continues An Indian court has convicted seven people for their part in one of the world's worst industrial disasters - the gas leak at the US-owned Union Carbide pesticide plant in Bhopal, Central India in 1984.

Floods and landslides kill 53 in southwest China
June 7, 2010 06:25 AM - Reuters

Flooding and landslides caused by heavy rain have killed 53 people in China's southwestern Guangxi region since late May, including three children swept away as they walked home from school, state media reported on Monday. The death toll was announced after rescuers found nearly 20 bodies in the aftermath of torrential rains between May 31 and June 2, the local flood control office said. The three dead children, missing since finishing school on June 1, were aged between 8 and 11. Their parents had left to work in cities, so they were walking unaccompanied to their grandparents' home.

EPA Takes a New Stance on Sulfur Dioxide in Final Rule
June 3, 2010 02:36 PM - David A Gabel, ENN

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) is a highly reactive gas that is produced from the combustion of fossil fuels. The largest sources of SO2 are power plants (73 percent) and other industrial facilities (20 percent). The gas is strongly linked to negative effects on the human respiratory system such as asthma. Children, the elderly, and those already with asthma are particularly vulnerable to its effects. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) says the new one-hour health standard will protect millions of citizens from short-term SO2 exposure.

First | Previous | 225 | 226 | 227 | 228 | 229 | Next | Last