Health

New Biochip Could Replace Animal Testing
December 18, 2007 06:22 PM -

BERKELEY -- With the cosmetics industry facing a European ban on animal testing in 2009, a newly developed biochip could provide the rapid analysis needed to insure that the chemicals in cosmetics are nontoxic to humans.

Many kids may not outgrow cow's milk allergy
December 18, 2007 06:09 PM - Joene Hendry, Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Cow's milk allergy persists longer than previously reported, and the majority of children may retain the sensitivity into school age, study findings suggest. "The old data saying that most milk allergy will be easily outgrown, usually by the age of 3 years, is most likely wrong," Dr. Robert A. Wood, at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, told Reuters Health. He and colleagues found that just 19 percent of children allergic to cow's milk outgrew their allergy by age 4.

Americans want fit finances before fit body: study
December 18, 2007 04:44 PM - Reuters

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - After a year of record mortgage foreclosures and slumping home prices, Americans are more determined to shape up their flabby finances in 2008 than their bodies, according to a study released by Countrywide Bank on Tuesday. Some 67 percent of the 1,002 adults surveyed nationwide said that becoming financially fit is a top New Year's resolution, while 57 percent are committed to becoming physically fit in 2008. "The results of the survey are an indicator that people are finally putting financial health on par with physical health," said clinical psychologist Dr. Melody Alderman in a statement from Countrywide.

Got fleas? Get the vacuum
December 18, 2007 04:25 PM - Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Vacuum cleaners kill fleas just as well as any poison, surprised researchers said on Tuesday. They said a standard vacuum cleaner abuses the fleas so much it kills 96 percent of adult fleas and 100 percent of younger fleas. So no need to worry that a vacuum cleaner bag may turn into a fleabag breeding ground for the pesky, biting creatures, said Glen Needham, associate professor of entomology at Ohio State University. Needham studied the cat flea, or Ctenocephalides felis, the most common type of flea found in households.

Overexcited Neurons Bad for Cell Health
December 18, 2007 04:24 PM -

EVANSTON, Ill. --- Neurotransmitters have consequences. They initiate events that are critical to a healthy life, giving us the ability to move, to talk, to breathe, to think. But that's if the neurotransmitters are getting it right and sending proper signals downstream to muscle cells, neurons or other cells.

FDA to add HIV warning to contraceptive products
December 18, 2007 04:04 PM - Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. regulators on Tuesday finalized a rule requiring makers of certain contraceptive gels, foams, films and inserts to carry a warning that the products do not protect against sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will require the warning on over-the-counter products containing nonoxynol 9, used in many stand-alone spermicides.

Ecuador Amazon plantiffs fight Chevron over dumping
December 18, 2007 01:35 PM - Alonso Soto, Reuters

SAN CARLOS, Ecuador (Reuters) - After a 14-year court battle, Ecuadorean jungle dwellers expect a verdict next year in their lawsuit charging Chevron with polluting the Amazon and vow to fight more delays by the U.S. oil giant. Peasants and Indians are suing Chevron Corp for $6 billion in a local court over accusations its Texaco unit polluted the jungle and damaged their health by dumping 18 billion gallons of contaminated water from 1972 to 1992.

2007 deadliest year for journalists since 1994: CPJ
December 18, 2007 12:22 PM - Michelle Nichols, Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters) - At least 64 journalists were killed in 2007, making it the deadliest year in more than a decade with Iraq the most dangerous place in the world to report, a U.S. media watchdog said on Monday. The New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists said the number of deaths was up from 56 last year and that it was still investigating whether another 22 deaths in 2007 were work-related.

Software grant could speed medicinal regeneration technologies
December 18, 2007 11:54 AM -

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - Regenerative medicine -- as in re-growing human limbs -- sounds like the basis for a Hollywood action movie. But a research group at Indiana University Bloomington led by biophysicist James Glazier will soon provide the scientific community with a new tool to help bring futuristic medical technologies to real-world laboratories. "The future of medicine is in regeneration," said Glazier, who heads Indiana University's Biocomplexity Institute. "And I expect it to be a reality within the next decade."

Canada says no risks from new mad cow case
December 18, 2007 11:43 AM - Reuters

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canada confirmed a new case of mad cow disease on Tuesday, the 11th since 2003, and said the animal in question was a 13-year-old beef cow from Alberta. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said no part of the animal's carcass had entered the human or animal food supply. The cow was born before Canada introduced a ban in 1997 on cattle feed that contained ingredients made from rendered cattle and other ruminants. Authorities blame suspect feed for most of the previous cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), known as mad cow disease. The CFIA repeated its statement that it expected to find a few cases of BSE over the next 10 years.

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