Health

California scientists create new standard for cleaner transportation fuels
December 13, 2007 04:32 PM - University of California Newswire

Davis, California - University of California experts today released their much-anticipated blueprint for fighting global warming by reducing the amount of carbon emitted when transportation fuels are used in California.  This "Low Carbon Fuel Standard," designed to stimulate improvements in transportation-fuel technologies, is expected to become the foundation for similar initiatives in other states, as well as nationally and internationally.

Poisonings, suicides fuel rise in U.S. injuries, deaths
December 13, 2007 03:44 PM - By Will Dunham, Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The death rate from injury in the United States is rising this decade after declining since the late 1970s, spurred by increases in accidental poisonings and suicides, health officials said on Thursday.

Indonesian man dies from bird flu
December 13, 2007 03:44 PM - Reuters

Runizar Roesin, head of the bird flu centre in Jakarta, told Reuters the 47-year-old man from Tangerang died on Thursday evening.

Mitchell steroid report fingers top baseball stars
December 13, 2007 03:13 PM - By Larry Fine, Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Dozens of top baseball stars including Roger Clemens were named on Thursday in the long-awaited Mitchell Report on steroids use, which Major League Baseball hopes will help clean its tarnished image.

Growing chronic disease will hit poor nations
December 13, 2007 12:58 PM - Naomi Antony, SciDevNet

Developing countries will be severely hit by a growing epidemic of chronic noncommunicable diseases (CNCDs), say the authors of a new series launched by The Lancet this week (4 December). CNCDs include heart disease, respiratory disease, diabetes and cancer — diseases that are often seen as secondary to the threat of infectious disease in the developing world. But experts say CNCDs are becoming an increasing danger, and low- and middle-income countries must take action now.

Countries 'ill prepared' as bird flu risk continues
December 13, 2007 12:54 PM - T. V. Padma, SciDevNet

NEW DELHI - Many countries continue to be plagued by poor bird flu surveillance and diagnosis capacity, and weak national preparedness plans, experts have warned.

The third global progress report of the United Nations System Influenza Coordination (UNSIC) and the World Bank is released this month (December). It warns that the risk of global influenza pandemic is as great in late 2007 as it was in mid-2005, when the first cases began to emerge.

Biocapture surfaces produced for study of brain chemistry
December 13, 2007 12:24 PM - Penn State

A research team at Penn State has developed a novel method for attaching small molecules, such as neurotransmitters, to surfaces, which then are used to capture large biomolecules. By varying the identity and spacing of the tethered molecules, researchers can make the technique applicable to a wide range of bait molecules including drugs, chemical warfare agents, and environmental pollutants. Ultimately, the researchers also hope to identify synthetic biomolecules that recognize neurotransmitters so that they can fabricate extremely small biosensors to study neurotransmission in the living brain.

Attractiveness Is Its Own Reward
December 13, 2007 12:12 PM - California Institute of Technology Newswire

PASADENA, Calif. --Studies of the snap judgments we often make about people are shedding new light not only on social behavior, but also on drug abuse, gambling addiction, and other disorders in which our ability to make decisions is impaired, say scientists at the California Institute of Technology.

Why use steroids? They work, at a cost
December 13, 2007 10:07 AM - Reuters

Former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell, who launched an independent probe into the use of performance-enhancing drugs in March 2006, was expected to name on Thursday at least 50 Major League Baseball players who used banned drugs, despite rules and health warnings.

Climate change poses dangerous health risks
December 13, 2007 06:38 AM - Reuters

NUSA DUA, Indonesia (Reuters) - Millions more people will be at risk from illnesses such as malaria and diarrhea in a warming world beset by heatwaves and water shortages, the World Health Organization said on Thursday.

Climate experts say rising temperatures and heatwaves will increase the number of heat-related deaths, while higher ozone levels from pollution will mean more people suffering from cardio-respiratory disease.

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