Health

Vaping doubles risk of smoking cigarettes for teens
September 19, 2017 04:44 PM - University of Waterloo

Teenagers who try e-cigarettes double their risk for smoking tobacco cigarettes, according to a new study.

The study — from the University of Waterloo and the Wake Forest School of Medicine — found that students in grades seven to 12 who had tried an e-cigarette are 2.16 times more likely to be susceptible to cigarette smoking.

Vaping doubles risk of smoking cigarettes for teens
September 19, 2017 04:44 PM - University of Waterloo

Teenagers who try e-cigarettes double their risk for smoking tobacco cigarettes, according to a new study.

The study — from the University of Waterloo and the Wake Forest School of Medicine — found that students in grades seven to 12 who had tried an e-cigarette are 2.16 times more likely to be susceptible to cigarette smoking.

Gulf Spill Oil Dispersants Associated with Health Symptoms in Cleanup Workers
September 19, 2017 03:36 PM - NIH / National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Workers who were likely exposed to dispersants while cleaning up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill experienced a range of health symptoms including cough and wheeze, and skin and eye irritation, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study appeared online Sept. 15 in Environmental Health Perspectives and is the first research to examine dispersant-related health symptoms in humans.

Exposure to Pet and Pest Allergens During Infancy Linked to Reduced Asthma Risk
September 19, 2017 11:02 AM - NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Children exposed to high indoor levels of pet or pest allergens during infancy have a lower risk of developing asthma by 7 years of age, new research supported by the National Institutes of Health reveals. The findings, published September 19 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, may provide clues for the design of strategies to prevent asthma from developing.

Exposure to Pet and Pest Allergens During Infancy Linked to Reduced Asthma Risk
September 19, 2017 11:02 AM - NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Children exposed to high indoor levels of pet or pest allergens during infancy have a lower risk of developing asthma by 7 years of age, new research supported by the National Institutes of Health reveals. The findings, published September 19 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, may provide clues for the design of strategies to prevent asthma from developing.

Scientists Discover Genetic Markers for Severe Form of Multiple Sclerosis
September 19, 2017 10:55 AM - Oregon Health & Science University

Scientists have uncovered two related cytokines and associated genetic markers that may explain why some people develop progressive multiple sclerosis, or MS. The study, led by researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, and Yale University, point the way toward developing the first-ever treatment to prevent progressive forms of the disease.

Scientists Discover Genetic Markers for Severe Form of Multiple Sclerosis
September 19, 2017 10:55 AM - Oregon Health & Science University

Scientists have uncovered two related cytokines and associated genetic markers that may explain why some people develop progressive multiple sclerosis, or MS. The study, led by researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, and Yale University, point the way toward developing the first-ever treatment to prevent progressive forms of the disease.

New Model May Help Overcome the Brain's Fortress-Like Barrier
September 19, 2017 10:49 AM - University of Portsmouth

Scientists have helped provide a way to better understand how to enable drugs to enter the brain and how cancer cells make it past the blood brain barrier.

New Model May Help Overcome the Brain's Fortress-Like Barrier
September 19, 2017 10:49 AM - University of Portsmouth

Scientists have helped provide a way to better understand how to enable drugs to enter the brain and how cancer cells make it past the blood brain barrier.

Altitude Training for Cancer-Fighting Cells
September 18, 2017 11:52 AM - Weizmann Institute of Science

Mountain climbers and endurance athletes are not the only ones to benefit from altitude training – that is, learning to perform well under low-oxygen conditions. It turns out that cancer-fighting cells of the immune system can also improve their performance through a cellular version of such a regimen. In a study published in Cell Reports, Weizmann Institute of Science researchers have shown that immune system’s killer T cells destroy cancerous tumors much more effectively after being starved for oxygen.

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