Health

Pre-eclampsia deaths are avoidable
February 10, 2017 10:27 AM - Kings College London

Pregnancy in the UK has never been safer, say scientists from King's College London writing in the latest edition of The Lancet.

Pre-eclampsia deaths are avoidable
February 10, 2017 10:27 AM - Kings College London

Pregnancy in the UK has never been safer, say scientists from King's College London writing in the latest edition of The Lancet.

Organic matter composition found to be critical factor in mercury methylation
February 9, 2017 09:27 AM - Uppsala University

The biological formation of neurotoxic methyl mercury is an enigmatic process underpinning mercury-related health and environmental hazards. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms and the factors controlling the process are still not well understood.

In a collaborative effort, researchers at Uppsala and Umeå University now show that the formation of methylmercury in sediment is controlled by the molecular composition of the organic matter. The study has been published in Nature Communications.

Unraveling the Myriad Causes Of North India's Pollution Pall
February 9, 2017 08:41 AM - Yale Environment 360

A brown cloud of air pollution now frequently shrouds much of northern India. It’s a growing regional health and environmental problem, and scientists are working to understand its many causes, which range from the burning of agricultural waste to auto emissions.

Study shows presence of any calcified plaque significantly raises risk of heart disease for people under age 50
February 8, 2017 01:08 PM - Vanderbilt University Medical Center

A major report led by Vanderbilt investigators found that the mere presence of even a small amount of calcified coronary plaque, more commonly referred to as coronary artery calcium (CAC), in people under age 50 — even small amounts — was strongly associated with increased risk of developing clinical coronary heart disease over the ensuing decade.

Study shows presence of any calcified plaque significantly raises risk of heart disease for people under age 50
February 8, 2017 01:08 PM - Vanderbilt University Medical Center

A major report led by Vanderbilt investigators found that the mere presence of even a small amount of calcified coronary plaque, more commonly referred to as coronary artery calcium (CAC), in people under age 50 — even small amounts — was strongly associated with increased risk of developing clinical coronary heart disease over the ensuing decade.

Drought identified as key to severity of West Nile virus epidemics
February 8, 2017 10:53 AM - Tim Stephens via University of California - Santa Cruz

A study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers has found that drought dramatically increases the severity of West Nile virus epidemics in the United States, although populations affected by large outbreaks acquire immunity that limits the size of subsequent epidemics.

The study, published February 8 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, involved researchers from UC Santa Cruz, Stanford University, and the New York State Department of Health. They analyzed 15 years of data on human West Nile virus infections from across the United States and found that epidemics were much larger in drought years and in regions that had not suffered large epidemics in the past.

University of Toronto scientist says diesel trains may expose passengers to exhaust
February 8, 2017 08:29 AM - University of Toronto

A new U of T study finds that diesel trains may expose passengers to elevated levels of certain pollutants, especially if they are sitting directly behind the locomotive.

University of Toronto scientist says diesel trains may expose passengers to exhaust
February 8, 2017 08:29 AM - University of Toronto

A new U of T study finds that diesel trains may expose passengers to elevated levels of certain pollutants, especially if they are sitting directly behind the locomotive.

Air pollution linked to heightened risk of Type 2 diabetes in obese Latino children
February 7, 2017 04:52 PM - Zen Vuong via University of Southern California

Latino children who live in areas with higher levels of air pollution have a heightened risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a new USC-led study.

Scientists tracked children’s health and respective levels of residential air pollution for about 3.5 years before associating chronic unhealthy air exposure to a breakdown in beta cells, special pancreatic cells that secrete insulin and maintain the appropriate sugar level in the bloodstream.

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