Health

New Tool Uses Behavioral Cues to Assess Pain in ICU Patients Who Can't Communicate
April 3, 2017 11:12 AM - Wolters Kluwer Health

A new Behavior Pain Assessment Tool (BPAT) provides a simple way to evaluate pain in critically ill patients—including those who aren't able to communicate their pain verbally, reports a study in PAIN®the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP)The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

New Tool Uses Behavioral Cues to Assess Pain in ICU Patients Who Can't Communicate
April 3, 2017 11:12 AM - Wolters Kluwer Health

A new Behavior Pain Assessment Tool (BPAT) provides a simple way to evaluate pain in critically ill patients—including those who aren't able to communicate their pain verbally, reports a study in PAIN®the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP)The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

London researchers enroll first Canadian patients in trial of tissue implant using patients' own cartilage cells
April 3, 2017 08:33 AM - University of Western Ontario

Dr. Alan Getgood and his team at Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute are the first in Canada to participate in an investigative trial to determine the safety and efficacy of using a patient’s own cartilage cells to repair knee cartilage injuries.

Battling nature's nasty side
April 3, 2017 08:33 AM - University of Saskatchewan

When told the subject of her research has a bit of an alien predator vibe, Natacha Hogan is quick to agree.

“Oh, I like that,” said the assistant professor in the Department of Animal and Poultry Science. “When you look at the structures of these mycotoxins, some really are scary looking. Many are very complex structures with multiple rings fused together and many functional groups hanging off the sides. They sort of look like spiders.”

These 5 tests better predict heart disease risk
March 31, 2017 09:48 AM - UT Southwestern Medical Center

Five simple medical tests together provide a broader and more accurate assessment of heart-disease risk than currently used methods, cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center found.

These 5 tests better predict heart disease risk
March 31, 2017 09:48 AM - UT Southwestern Medical Center

Five simple medical tests together provide a broader and more accurate assessment of heart-disease risk than currently used methods, cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center found.

New Research Sheds Light on Why Some People Are More Sensitive to Stress
March 31, 2017 07:37 AM - University of Guelph

Stress is a natural biological process enabling us to deal with the world around us. In short bursts, such as exercise or watching a thrilling film, stress is beneficial to the body. But when stress is too much or lasts too long, the effects can be detrimental to our health.

New Research Sheds Light on Why Some People Are More Sensitive to Stress
March 31, 2017 07:37 AM - University of Guelph

Stress is a natural biological process enabling us to deal with the world around us. In short bursts, such as exercise or watching a thrilling film, stress is beneficial to the body. But when stress is too much or lasts too long, the effects can be detrimental to our health.

New Report Finds EPA's Controlled Human Exposure Studies of Air Pollution Are Warranted
March 28, 2017 02:21 PM - National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) carries out experiments in which volunteer participants agree to be intentionally exposed by inhalation to specific pollutants at restricted concentrations over short periods to obtain important information about the effects of outdoor air pollution on human health.  A new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine finds these studies are warranted and recommends that they continue under ­­two conditions: when they provide additional knowledge that informs policy decisions and regulation of pollutants that cannot be obtained by other means, and when it is reasonably predictable that the risks for study participants will not exceed biomarker or physiologic responses that are of short duration and reversible.

New Report Finds EPA's Controlled Human Exposure Studies of Air Pollution Are Warranted
March 28, 2017 02:21 PM - National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) carries out experiments in which volunteer participants agree to be intentionally exposed by inhalation to specific pollutants at restricted concentrations over short periods to obtain important information about the effects of outdoor air pollution on human health.  A new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine finds these studies are warranted and recommends that they continue under ­­two conditions: when they provide additional knowledge that informs policy decisions and regulation of pollutants that cannot be obtained by other means, and when it is reasonably predictable that the risks for study participants will not exceed biomarker or physiologic responses that are of short duration and reversible.

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