Health

Griffith scientists engineer new cancer detection tool
June 8, 2017 09:40 AM - Griffith University

Studying the food poisoning bacteria E. coli may have led scientists to discover a new and improved tool to detect cancer.

In a collaborative research project, scientists from Griffith University’s Institute for Glycomics, the University of Adelaide and University of Queensland have detailed their findings in a new paper published in Scientific Reports.

Red Onions Pack a Cancer-Fighting Punch, Study Reveals
June 8, 2017 08:34 AM - University of Guelph

The next time you walk down the produce aisle of your grocery store, you may want to reach for red onions if you are looking to fight off cancer.

In the first study to examine how effective Ontario-grown onions are at killing cancer cells, U of G researchers have found that not all onions are created equal.

Don't rely on smartphone apps to treat back pain
June 7, 2017 12:51 PM - University of Sydney

Millions of people worldwide use back pain apps, however no independent guidance is available to help consumers identify which ones are safe and of high quality, a new study has found.

Don't rely on smartphone apps to treat back pain
June 7, 2017 12:51 PM - University of Sydney

Millions of people worldwide use back pain apps, however no independent guidance is available to help consumers identify which ones are safe and of high quality, a new study has found.

Data from satellite imagery useful for malaria early warning systems
June 7, 2017 09:39 AM - Umea University

Researchers at Umeå University have developed a model that uses seasonal weather data from satellite images to accurately predict outbreak of malaria with a one-month lead time. With a so-called GAMBOOST model, a host of weather information gathered from satellite images can be used as a cost-effective disease forecasting model, allowing health officials to get ahead of the malaria infection curve by allocating resources and mobilizing public health responses. The model was recently described in the journal Scientific Reports, a Nature Research publication.

Tulane researchers help find possible explanation for unparalleled spread of Ebola virus
June 7, 2017 08:47 AM - Tulane University

The world may be closer to knowing why Ebola spreads so easily thanks to a team of researchers from Tulane University and other leading institutions who discovered a new biological activity in a small protein from the deadly virus. The team’s findings were recently published in the Journal of Virology.

Tulane researchers help find possible explanation for unparalleled spread of Ebola virus
June 7, 2017 08:47 AM - Tulane University

The world may be closer to knowing why Ebola spreads so easily thanks to a team of researchers from Tulane University and other leading institutions who discovered a new biological activity in a small protein from the deadly virus. The team’s findings were recently published in the Journal of Virology.

Sowing Stem Cells: Lab-Grown Organoids Hold Promise for Patient Treatments
June 6, 2017 04:36 PM - University of California - San Francisco

Ophir Klein is growing teeth, which is just slightly less odd than what Jeffrey Bush is growing – tissues that make up the face. Jason Pomerantz is growing muscle; Sarah Knox is growing salivary glands; and Edward Hsiao is printing 3-D bone using a machine that looks about as complex as a clock radio.

Together, these members of the UC San Francisco faculty are cultivating organs of the craniofacial complex – the skull and face – which too often go terribly wrong during fetal development. Deformities of these bones or soft tissues, the most common of birth defects, can cut life short by blocking the airway or circulation. Or they can disfigure a face so profoundly that a child struggles to see, hear, or talk. Perhaps most painful of all, such deformities render children physically other, potentially leading to a lifetime of corrective surgeries and social isolation.

Sowing Stem Cells: Lab-Grown Organoids Hold Promise for Patient Treatments
June 6, 2017 04:36 PM - University of California - San Francisco

Ophir Klein is growing teeth, which is just slightly less odd than what Jeffrey Bush is growing – tissues that make up the face. Jason Pomerantz is growing muscle; Sarah Knox is growing salivary glands; and Edward Hsiao is printing 3-D bone using a machine that looks about as complex as a clock radio.

Together, these members of the UC San Francisco faculty are cultivating organs of the craniofacial complex – the skull and face – which too often go terribly wrong during fetal development. Deformities of these bones or soft tissues, the most common of birth defects, can cut life short by blocking the airway or circulation. Or they can disfigure a face so profoundly that a child struggles to see, hear, or talk. Perhaps most painful of all, such deformities render children physically other, potentially leading to a lifetime of corrective surgeries and social isolation.

Study Identifies an Enzyme Inhibitor to Treat Gulf War Illness Symptoms
June 6, 2017 04:24 PM - Drexel University

At least 100,000 military veterans who served in the 1990-1991 Gulf War were exposed to chemical weapons, released into the air after the United States bombed an ammunition depot in Khamisiyah, Iraq. Today, many are still suffering from Gulf War Illness, a mysterious, multi-symptom disease that experts believe is linked to organophosphate nerve agents sarin and cyclosarin.

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