Lifestyle

Artery disease rises among U.S. women: study
November 4, 2007 03:57 PM - Will Dunham

ORLANDO, Florida (Reuters) - More U.S. women are developing a type of artery disease that raises the risk of death from heart disease and stroke, researchers said on Sunday.

Researchers used U.S. government health surveys to track rates of peripheral artery disease, known as PAD, in people age 40 and up with no outward symptoms of cardiovascular illness. PAD is a circulatory condition in which narrowed arteries cut blood flow to the limbs.

Australian town to run on solar power in 2 years
November 4, 2007 03:51 PM -

SYDNEY (Reuters) - A sun-drenched town in Australia's north hopes to use only solar power in two years after being chosen as the site for a solar thermal power station.

Remote Cloncurry, which boasts recording Australia's hottest day, would be able to generate electricity on rare cloudy days and at night from the station, which runs off heat stored in graphite blocks.

Thousands perched on rooftops in Mexico floods
November 4, 2007 12:15 AM - Alberto Fajardo and Luis Manuel Lopez, Reuters

VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico (Reuters) - Thousands of people perched on roofs in southern Mexico on Saturday, desperate to be evacuated from flooding caused by heavy rains that has left most of Tabasco state under water and 800,000 people homeless.

Many were set to spend another night on their rooftops, with tens of thousands already crammed into emergency shelters struggling to provide enough hot meals and dry beds.

One group stranded on a roof held a banner reading: "Enough. There are children, pregnant women, sick women. Send the police."

Researchers can predict lung cancer survival
November 2, 2007 12:10 PM - UCLA News Service

Los Angeles - Researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered a novel mechanism to predict survival in older women with early stage lung cancer. The finding may have significant implications for new treatment approaches.

For the first time, UCLA researchers linked higher levels of aromatase, an enzyme that naturally makes estrogen from another hormone called androgen, to more aggressive disease and lower survival rates in women over 65 with Stage 1 or 2 lung cancer. The discovery not only gives physicians a possible new tool to predict survival but may also provide a target for therapy using aromatase inhibitors, already approved for the treatment of breast cancer.

 

 

 

 

U.S. pilot who dropped Hiroshima bomb dies - report
November 2, 2007 11:56 AM - Reuters

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Paul Tibbets, the pilot of the U.S. bomber that dropped the first atomic bomb on Japan on Aug. 6, 1945, died on Thursday at age 92, a newspaper reported.

Tibbets, who died at his home in Columbus, Ohio, had suffered strokes and was ill from heart failure, the Columbus Dispatch said in its online edition.

An experienced pilot who had flown some of the first bombing missions over Germany during World War Two, Tibbets was a 30-year-old colonel commanding the Enola Gay, a B-29 Superfortress bomber named for his mother.

Drowsy driving is big killer in U.S.
November 2, 2007 11:50 AM - Reuven Fenton, Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Darla Drentlaw was sleeping on her daughter Katie's bed, waiting for her to come home, when she woke to the sound of police radios. When the officers knocked on her door, she knew they had bad news.

Katie, an 18-year-old high school track star with blonde hair and a bright smile, had been driving home from a track meet that ended late at night. She fell asleep behind the wheel about 12 miles from her house in Prior Lake, Minnesota. She crashed into a dirt embankment and was killed.

"I thought it was just a bad dream, but no," said Drentlaw, 55. "I couldn't believe she fell asleep and we lost her."

Tens of thousands trapped in Mexico floods
November 2, 2007 11:37 AM - Luis Manuel Lopez, Reuters

VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico (Reuters) - Tens of thousands of Mexicans were trapped on rooftops and others clung to lampposts on Thursday after heavy rains flooded nearly the entire southern state of Tabasco.

At least 500,000 people were made homeless and one person was killed in the worst flooding the swampy state has seen in more than 50 years.

President Felipe Calderon said it was one of the worst natural disasters in Mexico's history.

Television images showed rescue workers hauling people out turbulent, brown waters that rose as high as the roofs of houses. Children floated down a street in a plastic tub.

Quake in west Japan could kill 42,000: report
November 2, 2007 08:10 AM - Reuters

Up to 42,000 people could be killed if a strong earthquake struck the Osaka metropolis and surrounding areas of western Japan, government experts said.

The worst-case scenario would be a magnitude 7.6 tremor shaking central Osaka on a winter morning around 5 a.m., as the deadly Kobe earthquake did in 1995, said a report issued by the Central Disaster Management Council on Thursday.

Diet, growth are major cancer causes: report
November 1, 2007 09:23 PM - Maggie Fox, Health and Science Editor

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - What people eat and how fast they grow are both significant causes of cancer, but many Americans still incorrectly believe that factors such as pesticides on food are bigger causes, experts reported on Wednesday.

Breastfeeding reduces the risk of cancer for mother and child, and tall people have a higher risk of cancer than shorter people, the report found.

"We need to think about cancer as the product of many long-term influences, not as something that 'just happens,'" Dr. Walter Willett, a nutrition expert at the Harvard School of Public Health in Massachusetts, told a news conference.

Saudi foreign minister says women should drive
November 1, 2007 09:06 PM -

LONDON (Reuters) - Saudi women should be given permission to drive, but it is not up to the government to impose such changes on society, Foreign Minister Saud al-Faisal said on Thursday.

Women are not permitted to drive cars in Saudi Arabia, where conservative Muslim clerics allied to the government wield wide authority.

"Myself, I think they should drive. But (we) are not the ones who decide on that. It has to be the families who decide on that," Prince Saud told Britain's Channel 4 news following a state visit by King Abdullah to London this week.

"For us, it is not a political issue, it is a social issue. We believe that this is something for the families to decide, for the people to decide and not to be forced by the government, either to drive or not to drive."

First | Previous | 263 | 264 | 265 | 266 | 267 | Next | Last