Lifestyle

Safety agency issues new batch of toy recalls
November 7, 2007 10:13 PM - By Karey Wutkowski, Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - More recalls of lead-tainted toys made in China were announced on Wednesday by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, including 380,000 toy cars sold at Dollar General stores.

Other warnings included smaller recalls of Dizzy Ducks music boxes, Winnie-the-Pooh spinning tops, "Big Red" wagons, Dragster and Funny Car toys, and Duck Family collectible wind-up toys, all because of paint with unsafe levels of lead.

Millions of similar toy recalls, most involving Chinese-made products, have alarmed American consumers in recent months. Lead is toxic and can pose serious health risks to children, including brain damage.

Maine officials OK 57 megawatt wind farm on Stetson Mountain
November 7, 2007 08:23 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

Boston, MA — A 57 megawatt wind generating farm planned for Stetson Mountain received a critical OK today from Maine officials. UPC Wind, a wind power company, received approval from the Maine Land Use Regulation Commission on a rezoning petition and preliminary plan for the company’s proposed (MW) Stetson Wind Project in Washington County, Maine.  The project is expected to boost the local economy and  produce clean energy for Maine. Officials  voted unanimously in favor of rezoning the project’s site.

Exposing Deadly Diseases in 3-D
November 7, 2007 06:50 PM -

CHICAGO --- With 3-D and some very high tech arrays of technology, scientists are able to 'see' deadly bacteria and viruses in three dimensions, and in all liklihood, come to new understands of how they work, and what will stop their deadly work.

The focus is the proteins of molecular sized killers. Scientists at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine are mapping parts of lethal bacteria in three dimensions, exposing a new and intimate chemical portrait of biological killers down to their atoms. This view of the disease will offer scientists who design drugs a fresh opening into the bacteria's vulnerabilities, and it's hoped, enable them to create drugs to disable it or vaccines to prevent it.  

 

Bill Clinton, Green Building Council Launch Effort To Green US Schools
November 7, 2007 04:44 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

Chicago - Today at the world’s largest green building exposition in Chicago, Greenbuild 2007, former President Bill Clinton announced a joint commitment to green all of America’s schools within a generation. 

Earth Day Network (EDN) – a Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI) and Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) partner – and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) joined former President Clinton in making this announcement to the American public and media. 

Today’s event formally kicked-off Earth Day Network’s national Green Schools campaign, which includes three major initiatives:  greening all new and existing school structures within a generation; developing and building healthier play areas and recreational facilities for all students; and working to greatly improve the food children eat in K-12 schools.  Along with USGBC and the Clinton Foundation, Earth Day Network will expand the green schools movement through legislation, education, and corporate and community volunteer greening efforts.

Caution Urged on Food Miles Issue
November 7, 2007 12:31 PM - Reuters

LONDON - Ending imports of fresh food from Africa under the pretext of combating climate change risks destroying entire communities that have become dependent on the trade, Ghana's High Commissioner to Britain said on Wednesday.

So-called food miles -- the distance food travels from producer to consumer -- have become a highly divisive issue as environmentalists try to persuade people to reduce the amount of climate warming carbon gases their lifestyle emits.

Store-bought freshwater fish contain elevated levels of mercury, arsenic and selenium
November 7, 2007 10:01 AM - University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

WASHINGTON, D.C.– White bass wild-caught and sold commercially contained significantly higher levels of mercury, arsenic and selenium than fish caught near former industrial areas. A University of Pittsburgh study, presented at a special session on “Contaminants in Freshwater Fish: Toxicity, Sources and Risk Communication,” expressed study results that mercury levels in freshwater fish were 2.2 to 4.8 times higher in fish caught in the Canadian Lake Erie than in those caught near former iron and steel mills on the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers in Pittsburgh.

 

 

 

Astronomers Find System With Five Planets
November 7, 2007 09:05 AM - Reuters

WASHINGTON - NASA scientists said they discovered a fifth planet orbiting a star outside our own solar system and say the discovery suggests there are many solar systems that are, just like our own, packed with planets.

The new planet is much bigger than Earth, but is a similar distance away from its sun, a star known as 55 Cancri, the astronomers said on Tuesday.

China Vows New Facelift for Pollution-Battered Buddha
November 7, 2007 09:01 AM - Reuters

BEIJING  - Chinese authorities will give a "facelift" to the world's tallest stone-carved Buddha just six years after the last repair effort as they struggle to fend off the effects of pollution and crowds, state media reported.

Carved out off a cliff beside a river, the 71-metre (233-ft) image of the seated Buddha at Leshan in the southwestern province of Sichuan is a magnet for tourists and the focus of local pride.

The Next Generation of Carbon Neutral Shipping ?
November 6, 2007 04:22 PM - Paul Schaefer

Denver, CO – Carbon neutral shipping has arrived. A Colorado company called Ship Green has launched an alternative that provides shoppers with tools to calculate and offset the carbon emissions created by each product shipped. The owners designed it they say to make it possible for customers to reduce the carbon footprint of each purchase. As businesses race to position themselves as leaders in the green economy. The new service targets both individuals and companies in the United States.

Diesel fumes may increase heart attack, stroke threat
November 6, 2007 01:58 PM - By Will Dunham

ORLANDO, Florida (Reuters) - Inhaling diesel exhaust fumes causes changes in the body that may make people more prone to heart attack or stroke, researchers said on Tuesday.

European scientists found that blood clots are more likely to form in otherwise healthy people exposed to relatively high amounts of diesel engine exhaust for a short time. This could cause a blocked vessel, heart attack or stroke.

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