Lifestyle

Hydrogen Shuttle Busses At The University of Missouri
September 19, 2007 02:06 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

LEHIGH VALLEY, Pa., - University of Missouri-Rolla students returning to fall classes treated to hydrogen powered shuttle busses - the state's first-ever demonstration program featuring hydrogen as an alternative fuel to power campus shuttle bus services. You can thank a company called Air Products for the development of hydrogen fueling technology and hydrogen infrastructure. The university and the company installed mobile hydrogen fueler technology at a nearby industrial park to provide fuel daily for the state's first hydrogen-powered shuttle bus service.

"It is always exciting to be part of a team leading the introduction of a new technology, and a college campus is a great place to showcase technological innovations," said Bob Kelly, business development manager for Hydrogen Energy Systems at Air Products. "The shuttle buses fueled by Air Products will travel campus streets daily to demonstrate the viability of hydrogen as an alternative fuel. We are pleased to be part of the team and commend the University of Missouri-Rolla for being a leader and promoting the use of alternative fuels and transportation."

Green Cupons For A Greener World?
September 19, 2007 12:08 PM -

LOS ANGELES - Today, everyone knows it's cool to be green. It's in the papers everyday. So why hasn't the idea of "Green Consumerism" taken hold among middle class Americans?

It's simple: convenience and price.

An environmentally friendly home improvement store isn't going to just appear before our eyes. And try finding any selection of "fair trade" clothing or "cruelty free" cosmetics in a department store. Retailers are slow to move towards products that traditionally have lower profit margins.

Arrest Made in 1993 Slaying in Buffalo
September 19, 2007 11:14 AM - Associated Press

Detectives have charged a man with a Buffalo strangling 14 years ago and say he is "a person of interest" in two other slayings in western New York.

 

China Tries Charm To Convince World Its Goods Safe
September 19, 2007 11:14 AM - Reuters

TIANJIN, China - China went on a charm offensive on Wednesday to convince a skeptical world its products are safe, as a new poll in the United States found 78 percent of Americans were worried about the safety of Chinese goods.  The State Council, or cabinet, took a group of reporters on a carefully choreographed visit to sparkling pharmaceutical plants in Beijing's neighboring city of Tianjin, led by smiling, relaxed officials unusually happy to answer questions.

 

One in four Americans "very worried" by China imports
September 19, 2007 11:06 AM - Missy Ryan, Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Around 78 percent of Americans worry about the safety of Chinese imports, and a quarter have stopped buying food from China, according to a Reuters/Zogby poll released on Wednesday.

Almost 35 percent of people polled said they were "very worried," and 43 percent "somewhat worried," about the safety of food and other Chinese goods. The survey followed a series of frightening reports of toys laced with lead paint, seafood containing banned antibiotics, contaminated toothpaste, and other risky products from China, a big U.S. trading partner.

The recall of hundreds of thousands of toys contaminated with lead paint from leading toymaker Mattel have been particularly troubling for parents.

Coca Cola and Greenpeace - Cooling the Beijing Olympics
September 19, 2007 11:04 AM - Greenpeace

Guess what? There is another big global warming problem — and we're tackling it in a BIG way! It's the chemical gases that make your air conditioner and refrigerator cool, trapping heat and removing it from your beer or your bedroom.  Ironically, these gases, called HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons), also do a really good job of trapping heat in the atmosphere contributing to global warming, when they eventually leak out of your car, your old fridge or air conditioner.

Move-In Recycling Effort Nets 23 Tons of Cardboard
September 19, 2007 08:54 AM - University of Virginia

VIRGINIA-  Twenty-three tons and counting. That’s how much cardboard the University of Virginia's recycling division collected in the two-week period surrounding Aug. 25, the day designated for students to move into University housing. To give you an idea of how heavy that is, it’s equivalent to the weight of about four female African elephants. Or, more than 300 students.

Stuck in Traffic? You're Not Alone
September 19, 2007 08:30 AM - AP

WASHINGTON -  Drivers waste nearly an entire work week each year sitting in traffic on the way to and from their jobs, according to a national study released Tuesday. The nation's drivers languished in traffic delays for a total of 4.2 billion hours in 2005, up from 4 billion the year before, according to the Texas Traffic Institute's urban mobility report. That's about 38 hours per driver.  "Things are bad and they're getting worse," said Alan Pisarski, a transportation expert and the author of "Commuting in America."

HP Expands Global Recycling Program in China
September 19, 2007 08:25 AM - HP

BEIJING, – HP announced it has extended its recycling program beyond corporate customers to include consumers and small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs).  Customers can drop off HP-branded technology equipment at HP service centers in 31 major cities in China. HP will accept free of charge any HP printer, scanner, fax machine, notebook or desktop computer, monitor, handheld device, camera and associated external components such as cables, mice and keyboards. After collection, HP will consolidate the products and sort for recycling locally in China.

Pesticides Pose Risk in Rural and Urban Communities Alike
September 19, 2007 08:01 AM - Alana Herro, Worldwatch Institute

n a recent study of 60 children of Latino farmworkers in the U.S. state of North Carolina, nearly 90 percent of those tested were found to have pesticide metabolites in their urine, according to a report in Environmental Health Perspectives. On average, the children had four different pesticides present in their urine, posing a potential long-term health risk. “Because children are so much smaller than adults and because they are developing rapidly, the effects of pesticides on their neurological systems can be devastating,” says Danielle Nierenberg, a food and agriculture researcher at the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, D.C.

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