Lifestyle

Study shows presence of any calcified plaque significantly raises risk of heart disease for people under age 50
February 8, 2017 01:08 PM - Vanderbilt University Medical Center

A major report led by Vanderbilt investigators found that the mere presence of even a small amount of calcified coronary plaque, more commonly referred to as coronary artery calcium (CAC), in people under age 50 — even small amounts — was strongly associated with increased risk of developing clinical coronary heart disease over the ensuing decade.

New doubts on whether early humans were forced to start farming
February 7, 2017 09:28 AM - University of Oxford

The development of agriculture is universally believed to underpin some of the most significant advances made by humans worldwide. In New Guinea, where one of the earliest human experiments with tropical forest agriculture occurred, researchers have cast doubt on two views about the origins of agriculture.

A future for skiing in a warmer world
February 6, 2017 10:28 AM - SINTEF

As the world struggles to make progress to limit climate change, researchers are finding ways to adapt to warmer winter temperatures — by developing environmentally friendly ways of producing artificial snow.

Chances are if you know anything about Norway, you know it’s a place where skiing was born.

Norse mythology describes gods and goddesses hunting on skis, and 4000–year-old petroglyphs from northern Norway include some of the earliest known drawings of people on skis. One of the most recognizable Norwegian paintings worldwide depicts two skiers in 1206 fleeing to safety with the country’s two-year-old prince, Håkon Håkonsson.

A new study confirms: Pregnant women should avoid liquorice
February 3, 2017 09:59 AM - University of Helsinki

Liquorice and its natural sweetener, glycyrrhizin, can have long-term harmful effects on the development of the fetus.

 

A new study confirms: Pregnant women should avoid liquorice
February 3, 2017 09:59 AM - University of Helsinki

Liquorice and its natural sweetener, glycyrrhizin, can have long-term harmful effects on the development of the fetus.

 

Increasing factory and auto emissions disrupt natural cycle in East China Sea
February 1, 2017 09:54 AM - University of California - Irvine

China’s rapid ascent to global economic superpower is taking a toll on some of its ancient ways. For millennia, people have patterned their lives and diets around the vast fisheries of the East China Sea, but now those waters are increasingly threatened by human-caused, harmful algal blooms that choke off vital fish populations, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Irvine.

“There has been massive growth in emissions from China’s factories and cars over the past few decades, and what comes out of the smokestacks and tailpipes tends to be richer in nitrogen than phosphorus,” said Katherine Mackey, assistant professor of Earth system science at UCI and lead author of the study, published recently in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Air pollution may lead to dementia in older women
January 31, 2017 05:02 PM - Zen Vuong via University of Southern California

Tiny air pollution particles — the type that mainly comes from power plants and automobiles — may greatly increase the chance of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, according to USC-led research.

Scientists and engineers found that older women who live in places with fine particulate matter exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s standard are 81 percent more at risk for global cognitive decline and 92 percent more likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer’s.

Study suggests fitness and iron deficiency linked to GPA
January 25, 2017 12:28 PM - University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Pennsylvania State University have found that a student’s fitness level and iron status could be the difference between making an A or a B.

Targeting Cookstove Pollution Using Supercomputers and NASA Satellites
January 23, 2017 04:02 PM - University of Colorado At Boulder

New air quality research is investigating a major, but often overlooked contributor to outdoor pollution and climate: burning of solid fuel for cooking and heating.

Cookstove studies typically evaluate how they contribute to indoor air quality issues in houses where solid fuel is frequently used for cooking and heating. A new paper from the University of Colorado Boulder appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, has taken a different approach, going outside the home and evaluating how cookstoves impact ambient air pollution and climate.

Trees supplement income for rural farmers in Africa
January 23, 2017 01:38 PM - University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES)

Trees may be easy to spot on the plains of Africa but they are often overlooked as a source of income for farmers. A University of Illinois study shows trees on farms may help reduce rural poverty and maintain biodiversity.

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