Lifestyle

Why Japan's Coastal Zones might be Disappearing due to Climate Change
July 17, 2017 11:17 AM - World Scientific Publishing

Projections of Future Beach Loss in Japan Due to Sea-Level Rise and Uncertainties in Projected Beach Loss

Surging Heat May Limit Aircraft Takeoffs Globally
July 13, 2017 08:46 AM - The Earth Institute - Columbia University

Rising temperatures due to global warming will make it harder for many aircraft around the world to take off in coming decades, says a new study. During the hottest parts of the day, 10 to 30 percent of fully loaded planes may have to remove some fuel, cargo or passengers, or else wait for cooler hours to fly, the study concludes. The study, which is the first such global analysis, appears today in the journal Climatic Change.

France Will Ditch Gas and Diesel Cars by 2040
July 12, 2017 10:28 AM - S.E. Smith, Care2, Care2

Parisian streets will be a little quieter in 2040, the year France has set as a target for getting gas and diesel cars off the road. French officials are speaking out on the need to commit to environmental health, and this initiative accompanies other programs aimed at reducing the country’s carbon emissions.

Generous people live happier lives
July 11, 2017 12:03 PM - University of Zurich

Generosity makes people happier, even if they are only a little generous. People who act solely out of self-interest are less happy. Merely promising to be more generous is enough to trigger a change in our brains that makes us happier. This is what UZH neuroeconomists found in a recent study.

What some have been aware of for a long time, others find hard to believe: Those who are concerned about the well-being of their fellow human beings are happier than those who focus only on their own advancement. Doing something nice for another person gives many people a pleasant feeling that behavioral economists call a warm glow. In collaboration with international researchers, Philippe Tobler and Ernst Fehr from the Department of Economics at the University of Zurich investigated how brain areas communicate to produce this feeling. The results provide insight into the interplay between altruism and happiness.

Study finds hackers could use brainwaves to steal passwords
July 7, 2017 04:55 PM - University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham suggest that brainwave-sensing headsets, also known as EEG or electroencephalograph headsets, need better security after a study reveals hackers could guess a user’s passwords by monitoring their brainwaves.

EEG headsets are advertised as allowing users to use only their brains to control robotic toys and video games specifically developed to be played with an EEG headset. There are only a handful on the market, and they range in price from $150 to $800.

Pokémon Go Anniversary: Kent State Researcher Study Link Between the Viral Mobile App and a Healthier Lifestyle
July 6, 2017 03:52 PM - Kent State University

Today marks the one year anniversary of Pokémon GO’s worldwide release that sent crowds hiking through parks, meandering into streets and walking for miles in search of Pokémon, those cute little digital characters that appear in real locations on your smartphone.

Regulating the indirect land use carbon emissions from biofuels imposes high hidden costs on fuel consumers
July 5, 2017 11:55 AM - UIUC College of Agriculture, Consumer, and Environmental Sciences

Farmers earn more profits when there is demand for corn for biofuel instead of for food only. This can lead some to convert grasslands and forests to cropland. This conversion, also called indirect land use change, can have large-scale environmental consequences, including releasing stored carbon into the atmosphere. To penalize the carbon emissions from this so-called indirect land use change, the USEPA and California Air Resources Board include an indirect land use change factor when considering the carbon savings with biofuels for their compliance with the federal Renewable Fuel Standard or California’s Low-Carbon Fuel Standard.

Ensuring carpoolers are compatible is key to ridesharing success
July 4, 2017 01:16 PM - University of Waterloo

Ensuring that would-be carpoolers are riding with people they actually like could potentially decrease car use by nearly 60 per cent, research from a professor at the University of Waterloo has found.

Look inside your own pantry or fridge to find the top culprit of food waste
June 26, 2017 08:36 AM - Iowa State University

There is a good chance there are fresh vegetables in your refrigerator that will end up in the garbage instead of on your dinner plate.

Not that anyone goes to the grocery store with the intention of later throwing the food in the trash, but we all do it more often than we probably realize. Ruth Litchfield, a professor of food science and human nutrition at Iowa State University, says we waste about 20 pounds of food each month. And that is per person.

A lover's touch eases pain as heartbeats, breathing sync, CU study says
June 21, 2017 02:21 PM - University of Colorado Boulder

Fathers-to-be, take note: You may be more useful in the labor and delivery room than you realize.

That’s one takeaway from a study released last week that found that when an empathetic partner holds the hand of a woman in pain, their heart and respiratory rates sync and her pain dissipates.

“The more empathic the partner and the stronger the analgesic effect, the higher the synchronization between the two when they are touching,” said lead author Pavel Goldstein, a postdoctoral pain researcher in the Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Lab at CU Boulder.

The study of 22 couples, published in the journal Scientific Reports last week, is the latest in a growing body of research on “interpersonal synchronization,” the phenomenon in which individuals begin to physiologically mirror the people they’re with.

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