Get the ENN
mobile app

iOS Android



Pollution

New oil repellant materials could help clean up oil spills
April 15, 2015 03:34 PM - Scott Gordon, University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have announced a significant step forward in the development of materials that can ward off oil — a discovery that could lead to new protective coatings and better approaches to cleaning up oil spills. In a new paper in the journal Advanced Functional Materials, professor of chemical and biological engineering David Lynn and assistant scientist Uttam Manna describe new coatings that are extremely oil-repellant (or "superoleophobic") in underwater environments.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Pollution Topic

ADVERTISEMENT

Five Years and Counting: Gulf Wildlife in the Aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon Disaster
April 17, 2015 09:37 AM - National Wildlife Federation

Five years after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, sending oil into the Gulf of Mexico for 87 days, wildlife are still struggling. The Gulf, with its deep waters, sandy beaches, lush wetlands and coral reefs, is a vast system that supports more than 15,000 species of wildlife – fish, birds, marine mammals and many, many others.

A new report from the National Wildlife Federation looks at how 20 types of wildlife that depend on a healthy Gulf are faring in the wake of the BP oil spill. The full extent of the spill’s impacts may take years or even decades to unfold, but Five Years & Counting: Gulf Wildlife in the Aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon Disaster examines what the science tells us so far.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Wildlife Topic

SPOTLIGHT

Massive Landfill Site Turns Into Thriving Eco-Park

Jacob Ryan, NoCamels

Israel’s largest landfill dump has undergone a massive makeover that has seen the mountain of garbage turn into a 2,000-acre ecological park three times the size of New York City’s Central Park. This new “green lung,” which includes a 150-acre recycling station, walking and cycling trails, ponds and extreme sports activities, will soon be home to a 50,000-seat amphitheater, one of the largest concert venues in Israel. And if that’s not enough, the biogas from this landfill, once a toxic pollutant, is now being reused as green energy.

The multi-million-dollar makeover of Hiriya, which started in 2001, has proven to benefit both the surrounding environment and visitors from all over the world. Now, what once was a huge dump between Road 4 and Road 461 in central Israel known for its unpleasant past, is no longer Israel’s ugliest site. 

What's new on our Community Blog



Monoculture Threatens Margaritas

April 15th, 2015
Tequila’s soaring popularity is creating agricultural risks that may force its own collapse if current production practices continue.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

15 Practical Tips for Sustainable Travel

April 13th, 2015
With more than a billion people traveling each year, how can we see the world without destroying it? The answer is sustainable travel or simply put, traveling responsibly.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

How Urbanization Affects the Environment

April 6th, 2015
By 2050 it is predicted that up to 85% of the world will be urbanized and it is important this development is managed carefully so the detrimental effects are minimized. How will this affect wildlife when in the United States 275 species are already endangered as a result of urbanization?
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2015©. Copyright Environmental News Network