Pollution

Merck Fined $1.5M, Settles Clean Water Act Violations, Fined $1.5 Million, Must Overhaul Disposal System, Invest Millions
December 13, 2007 09:23 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

WASHINGTON - Merck, the global pharmaceutical research company, has agreed to resolve violations of federal and state water pollution control regulations arising from spills including a June 2006 spill at its pharmaceutical plant outside of Philadelphia, announced Pat Meehan, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, Ronald J. Tenpas, Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

 

Progress declared in Chesapeake Bay Restoration Efforts
December 13, 2007 09:08 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

ANNAPOLIS, Md. -  Pennsylvania's combination of mandatory requirements and environmental stewardship has led to sizeable reductions in nutrient and sediment pollution to the Chesapeake Bay since 2004.

The Governor Rendell also announced that Pennsylvania will use its strengths in agriculture and alternative energy development to push for important federal farm legislation and technological breakthroughs in producing biofuels.

Senate oks energy bill to cut vehicle fuel use
December 13, 2007 08:09 PM - By Tom Doggett, Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate late on Thursday approved a broad energy bill to increase the fuel efficiency of U.S. cars and trucks by Congress for the first time since 1975 and significantly boost production of renewable motor fuels like ethanol.

Lice from fish farms threaten Canadian wild salmon
December 13, 2007 05:13 PM - Julie Steenhuysen, Reuters

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Infestations of sea lice at salmon farms on Canada's west coast are threatening local wild pink salmon populations and could result in their extinction in another four years, Canadian researchers said on Thursday.

California scientists create new standard for cleaner transportation fuels
December 13, 2007 04:32 PM - University of California Newswire

Davis, California - University of California experts today released their much-anticipated blueprint for fighting global warming by reducing the amount of carbon emitted when transportation fuels are used in California.  This "Low Carbon Fuel Standard," designed to stimulate improvements in transportation-fuel technologies, is expected to become the foundation for similar initiatives in other states, as well as nationally and internationally.

Scientists unlock secret of emerging chikungunya virus's spread
December 13, 2007 03:54 PM - T. V. Padma, SciDevNet

University of Texas  -  A simple protein change in the chikungunya virus enables it to adapt to new mosquito hosts and spread to more regions, new research shows. Studies at the US-based University of Texas Medical Branch have found that a single amino acid change in the protein of the virus's outer shell helps it adapt to a new mosquito host, Aedes albopictus. The findings were published last in PLoS Pathogens.

Indonesian man dies from bird flu
December 13, 2007 03:44 PM - Reuters

Runizar Roesin, head of the bird flu centre in Jakarta, told Reuters the 47-year-old man from Tangerang died on Thursday evening.

Mitchell steroid report fingers top baseball stars
December 13, 2007 03:13 PM - By Larry Fine, Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Dozens of top baseball stars including Roger Clemens were named on Thursday in the long-awaited Mitchell Report on steroids use, which Major League Baseball hopes will help clean its tarnished image.

Acid seas huge threat to coral reefs: study
December 13, 2007 02:15 PM - By Jim Loney, Reuters

MIAMI (Reuters) - In less than 50 years, oceans may be too acidic for coral reefs to grow because of carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels by humans, according to research released on Thursday.

Biocapture surfaces produced for study of brain chemistry
December 13, 2007 12:24 PM - Penn State

A research team at Penn State has developed a novel method for attaching small molecules, such as neurotransmitters, to surfaces, which then are used to capture large biomolecules. By varying the identity and spacing of the tethered molecules, researchers can make the technique applicable to a wide range of bait molecules including drugs, chemical warfare agents, and environmental pollutants. Ultimately, the researchers also hope to identify synthetic biomolecules that recognize neurotransmitters so that they can fabricate extremely small biosensors to study neurotransmission in the living brain.

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