Pollution

Emissions cap for poor unlikely at Bali talks
December 7, 2007 07:06 AM - Reuters

NUSA DUA, Indonesia (Reuters) - The chance that developing countries would accept firm emissions-cutting targets receded on Friday, as U.N.-led talks to launch negotiations on a climate pact to succeed the Kyoto Protocol inched forwards.

About a dozen trade ministers meet in Bali at the weekend and finance ministers from Monday, their first-ever visit to the annual U.N. climate meeting normally attended by environment ministers, to help spur a booming global "green" economy.

"Nothing's been ruled out," said Yvo de Boer, head of the U.N. Climate Change Secretariat at the December 3-14 talks being held at a luxury beach resort in Bali, Indonesia.

 

Tanker Leaks Oil Off S.Korea Coast
December 7, 2007 05:45 AM - Reuters

SEOUL (Reuters) - A large oil tanker gushed thousands of tons of oil into the sea near one of South Korea's most scenic coastlines after being hit by a barge, South Korea's maritime ministry said on Friday.

The Hong Kong-registered Hebei Spirit was struck while at anchor off Daesan port in the Taean region on the country's west coast and the ministry said it had already leaked some 10,800 metric tons of crude oil.

"A barge ship being towed ... collided with the oil tanker at anchor, breaching the cargo section and leaking crude oil," ministry official Lee Jang-hoon told reporters.

California sets key climate targets
December 7, 2007 04:25 AM - Reuters

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - California on Thursday set key emissions targets and became the first state to require heavy industries to report their greenhouse gases, major steps in its landmark law to reduce global warming.

Starting in 2008, owners of power plants, oil refineries, cement plants and other big polluters will tell the state how much carbon dioxide (CO2) and other gases they spew. By 2010, those reports will be independently verified.

Also on Thursday, the California Air Resources Board set a specific emissions target for the state to meet by 2020 .

Hong Kong chokes on pollution
December 7, 2007 04:10 AM - Reuters

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong warned people with heart or lung problems to avoid outdoor activities on Friday as the territory experienced one of its most polluted days of the year, with the hills across the harbor almost invisible.

Pollution monitoring stations registered "very high" readings in several spots around the former British colony, and the Environmental Protection Department said the poor air was expected to continue.

Hong Kong's air has become increasingly clogged with pollutants from cars, ships, power plants and a booming manufacturing sector across the border in China's Guangdong province.

Polish energy sector to be hit hardest by CO2 quota
December 6, 2007 02:23 PM - Reuters

WARSAW (Reuters) - Energy will be among the sectors that bear the brunt of the European Union's decision to cut by 27 percent Poland's 2008-2012 carbon emissions quota, the environment minister said on Thursday.

The European Commission cut the annual quota for central Europe's biggest economy to 208.5 million tonnes as part of its attempts to shore up the emissions trading scheme, the EU's key tool to curb global warming.

Making Gold the Greener Way
December 6, 2007 10:16 AM - Sarah Niman -The Canadian Press

A Yukon company is slated to be the world's first recognized producer of eco-gold.

Mammoth Tusk Gold Inc. is joining the trend of using socially and environmentally sound gold-mining procedures to produce what is known as eco-gold, and is the first to provide government-supported certification. But there is no internationally recognized certification process for eco-gold.

What's next for Australia as it joins Kyoto?
December 6, 2007 09:54 AM - , Private Landowner Network

Within seconds of being sworn in, Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd signed documents to bring Australia into the Kyoto Protocol.

"This is the first official act of the new Australian government," he said.

Polluting Pulp Mill Draws Protest and Spurs World Court Case
December 6, 2007 09:17 AM - , Worldwatch Institute

Environmentalists from Argentina are continuing their more than two-year protest of an Uruguayan pulp mill along a river that separates the two countries. Protesters say the cellulose processing plant, which went into operation on November 9, will release pollutants into the Uruguay River and threaten local ecosystems and human health. Argentine authorities claim that the mill violates a bilateral treaty and have taken the issue to the International Court of Justice in The Hague, The Netherlands.

Communities Across the Globe Getting to Grips with Adapting to Climate Change
December 6, 2007 09:13 AM - UNEP

Bali/Nairobi, 4 December 2007 - The way farmers in the Sudan, flood-prone communities in Argentina and dengue-challenged islands in the Caribbean are beginning to adapt to climate change are distilled in a new report launched today.

The five-year Assessments of Impacts and Adaptations to Climate Change provides new and inspiring examples of how vulnerable communities and countries may 'climate proof' economies in the years and decades to come.

Stop the Vote! Can a Cap-and-Trade System Really Work to Reduce Emissions in the U.S.?
December 6, 2007 09:04 AM - , Triple Pundit

In theory, a U.S. Federal Cap-and-Trade System provides market incentives to lower our nations's carbon emissions. That is why the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee is seriously considering adopting the Warner-Lieberman Bill this week (albeit with currently over 150 amendments). But the E.U. experience with a Cap-and-Trade market shows that carbon emissions have increased under this policy.

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