Pollution

Coal giant offers cash for biggest clean rival
July 22, 2009 10:59 AM - Tyler Hamilton , TheStar.com

Canada's biggest generator of dirty power has launched a hostile bid for the country's leading developer of clean power, which could be the first of many moves in an energy sector that sees big polluters trying to green up their assets.

Air Pollution Linked to Diminishing IQ of Children

A new study published in the August 2009 edition of Pediatrics shows a possible disturbing correlation between increased urban air pollution and decreased IQ points in children. The study sites polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), or "chemicals released into the air from the burning of coal, diesel, oil, and gas, or other organic substances such as tobacco" as the major perpetrators of inner- city air pollution, with a particular focus on motor vehicle use.

Hydrofluorocarbons, Once a Solution, Now a Problem?
July 20, 2009 07:44 AM - David A. Fahrenthold, Washington Post

Scientists say the chemicals that helped solve the last global environmental crisis -- the hole in the ozone layer -- are making the current one worse. They worked: The earth's protective shield seems to be recovering. But researchers say what's good for ozone is bad for climate change.

Fertilizer’s Contamination Legacy
July 19, 2009 07:21 AM - , Organic Consumers Association

Perchlorate-contaminated groundwater could be a widespread legacy of the U.S.'s agricultural past, according to researchers who have pioneered perchlorate forensics. The researchers, led by John Karl Bhlke of the U.S. Geological Survey, used isotopes and other geochemical tracers to identify perchlorate sources. The impact of the historic use of Chilean nitrate fertilizer from the Atacama Desert, which contains naturally occurring perchlorate, is emerging from studies such as one published recently in ES&T.

Mystery of Los Angeles Methane Emissions Probed
July 19, 2009 07:09 AM - New Scientist

The Los Angeles metropolitan area belches far more methane into its air than scientists had previously realized. If other megacities are equally profligate, urban methane emissions may represent a surprisingly important source of this potent greenhouse gas. Atmospheric researchers have long had good estimates of global methane emissions, but less is known about exactly where these emissions come from, particularly in urban areas.

Are Aluminum Bottles Greener than Glass?
July 18, 2009 11:33 AM - , Triple Pundit

Aluminum as a substitute for glass bottles has been inching its way into the consumer experience in the last few years, most notably in the US in the form of beer bottles from Anheuser-Busch and Iron City Beer, a popular regional brand founded in Pittsburgh. Coca-cola has also announced plans to roll out aluminum bottles in this country, though only in limited venues.

Chemical Industry Touts Carbon Emissions Saved By Chemical Products
July 16, 2009 10:20 AM - GreenBiz.com

The International Council of Chemical Associations has released a report looking at the lifecycle impacts of products made from chemicals, showing how certain products can prevent and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Exxon Plan to develop biofuel from algae

Exxon Mobil Corp will invest $600 million over the next five to six years on trying to developing biofuel from algae, even though the oil major has said renewables will be only a small part of global energy supply. Exxon, placing its largest financial bet on renewable fuels, is forming a research and development alliance with Synthetic Genomics Inc, a privately held company that focuses on gene-based research, the company said on Tuesday.

What caused global warming 55 million years ago?
July 15, 2009 08:05 AM - Canada.com from Agence France-Presse

A runaway spurt of global warming 55 million years ago turned Earth into a hothouse but how this happened remains worryingly unclear, scientists said on Monday. Previous research into this period, called the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, or PETM, estimates the planet's surface temperature blasted upwards by between five and nine degrees Celsius in just a few thousand years.

Comment on: Colgate University a Green Leader
July 14, 2009 01:00 PM - Molly Molendyke, ENN

Colgate University is a small school in central New York that features big time academics in a small town setting. The school is abounded on all sides by farmland, and with the Great Lakes just a few hundred miles northwest, lake-effect weather causes the quiet campus to be under a blanket of snow from October to April. As part of what Newsweek deemed the "New Ivy League," the prestigious school has decided to begin a huge undertaking: Going green. Although the Colgate has always been environmentally conscious (its location in the middle of vast tracts of farmland and forest make it difficult not to be), recently, professors, administrators, and staff have converged to form the Environmental Council to facilitate the University's widespread environmentalism.

First | Previous | 281 | 282 | 283 | 284 | 285 | Next | Last