Pollution

A Chinese Megacity Bus Fleet Goes Fully Electric
January 3, 2018 02:09 PM - Yale Environment 360

The Chinese megacity of Shenzhen has successfully switched 100 percent of its 16,359-vehicle bus fleet to electric vehicles, reaching its goal just six years after it vowed to move away from diesel engines, according to reporting by CleanTechnica and other news outlets. The fleet — which has three times as many buses as New York City — serves a population of 12 million. The switch is expected to save the equivalent of 345,000 tons of diesel fuel and cut 1.35 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

NASA-led Study Solves a Methane Puzzle
January 3, 2018 11:23 AM - Carol Rasmussen, NASA

A new NASA-led study has solved a puzzle involving the recent rise in atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas, with a new calculation of emissions from global fires. The new study resolves what looked like irreconcilable differences in explanations for the increase.

NASA-led Study Solves a Methane Puzzle
January 3, 2018 11:23 AM - Carol Rasmussen, NASA

A new NASA-led study has solved a puzzle involving the recent rise in atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas, with a new calculation of emissions from global fires. The new study resolves what looked like irreconcilable differences in explanations for the increase.

Arctic Clouds Highly Sensitive to Air Pollution
January 3, 2018 10:43 AM - University of Utah

In 1870, explorer Adolf Erik Nordenskiöld, trekking across the barren and remote ice cap of Greenland, saw something most people wouldn’t expect in such an empty, inhospitable landscape: haze.

A Fossil Fuel Technology That Doesn't Pollute
January 2, 2018 03:57 PM - Ohio State University

Engineers at The Ohio State University are developing technologies that have the potential to economically convert fossil fuels and biomass into useful products including electricity without emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

Researchers discover higher environmental impact from cookstove emissions
January 2, 2018 11:42 AM - Washington University in St. Louis

Cookstoves are a central part of millions of homes throughout Asia: families often use readily available and cheap biofuels — such as crop chaff or dung — to prepare the food needed to survive.

Short-term exposure to low levels of air pollution linked with premature death among U.S. seniors
December 28, 2017 11:12 AM - Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Short-term exposures to fine particulate air pollution and ozone—even at levels well below current national safety standards—were linked to higher risk of premature death among the elderly in the U.S. according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The risk was even higher among elderly who were low-income, female, or Black.

The study was published December 26, 2017 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

A simple solution for terrible traffic
December 28, 2017 10:52 AM - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Cities plagued with terrible traffic problems may be overlooking a simple, low-cost solution: High-occupancy vehicle (HOV) policies that encourage carpooling can reduce traffic drastically, according to a new study co-authored by MIT economists.

Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires
December 28, 2017 09:53 AM - Hokkaido University

Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests.

Cleaner air, longer lives
December 27, 2017 03:12 PM - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The air we breathe contains particulate matter from a range of natural and human-related sources. Particulate matter is responsible for thousands of premature deaths in the United States each year, but legislation from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is credited with significantly decreasing this number, as well as the amount of particulate matter in the atmosphere. However, the EPA may not be getting the full credit they deserve: New research from MIT’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) proposes that the EPA’s legislation may have saved even more lives than initially reported.

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