Pollution

People of color still exposed to more air pollution
September 15, 2017 12:26 PM -

Pollution exposure for minority groups is still a big problem, according to a new nationwide study conducted by a team of researchers led by CEE professor Julian Marshall

The study found that during a 10-year period, little progress was made in reducing disparities between whites and people of color when it comes to being exposed to harmful air pollution emitted by vehicles. The study focused specifically on outdoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, which is a transportation-related pollutant.

New Orleans Greenery Post-Katrina Reflects Social Demographics More Than Storm Impact
September 15, 2017 11:25 AM - Ecological Society of America

Popular portrayals of “nature reclaiming civilization” in flood-damaged New Orleans, Louisianna, neighborhoods romanticize an urban ecology shaped by policy-driven socioecological disparities in redevelopment investment, ecologists argue in a new paper in the Ecological Society of America’s open access journal Ecosphere.

Ethanol to Gasoline Switch Raises Nanoparticles in Air
September 14, 2017 09:47 AM - , SciDevNet

Using ethanol instead of gasoline as a car fuel can reduce emissions of ultrafine particles by a third, which benefits human health and the environment, according to a new study.

 

Cost of U.S. Solar Drops 75 percent in Six Years, Ahead of Federal Goal
September 13, 2017 04:41 PM - Yale Environment 360

The Trump administration has announced that a federal goal to slash the cost of utility-scale solar energy to 6 cents per kilowatt-hour by 2020 has been met early. The goal, set by the Obama administration in 2011 and known as the SunShot Initiative, represents a 75 percent reduction in the cost of U.S. solar in just six years. It makes solar energy-cost competitive with electricity generated by fossil fuels.

Wax On, Melt Off
September 13, 2017 12:32 PM - Drexel University

Drexel University researchers have made a discovery that could create roads that melt off ice and snow during winter storms. Their secret? — Adding a little paraffin wax to the road’s concrete mix.

Low-Level Radiation Less Harmful to Health Than Other Lifestyle Risks
September 13, 2017 11:02 AM - University of Oxford

Human populations have always been exposed to ionizing radiation, and more so in modern life due to its use in medicine, industry and the armed forces. Whilst the risks to human health from medium and high-level radiation are relatively well-understood, the risks at lower levels are less clear.  Mixed messages about the safety of low doses of radiation from different sources have created confusion for the public and for policy makers.  

An important process that fuels harmful algal blooms investigated in water bodies across Canada
September 13, 2017 08:41 AM - Canadian Science Publishing

For many Canadians, summer time means time at the lake, swimming, fishing, boating, and relaxing. Nothing can spoil this experience like blue-green mats of muck, caused by algal blooms. These blooms negatively affect not only recreational activities but also put drinking water source, property values, wildlife, and human health at risk. In the 1970s, scientists discovered that the nutrient phosphorus caused algal blooms, which led to new regulations and improved sewage treatment. Nevertheless, blooms continue to plague many Canadian lakes. To investigate what might be happening, scientists looked to see whether phosphorus might be recirculating from the mud at the bottom of lakes back into the water.

Airline industry could fly thousands of miles on biofuel from a new promising feedstock
September 11, 2017 05:44 PM - Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology

A Boeing 747 burns one gallon of jet fuel each second. A recent analysis from researchers at the University of Illinois estimate that this aircraft could fly for 10 hours on bio-jet fuel produced on 54 acres of specially engineered sugarcane.

Air pollution cuts three years off lifespans in northern China
September 11, 2017 03:54 PM - University of Chicago

There are currently an estimated 4.5 billion people around the world exposed to levels of particulate air pollution that are at least twice what the World Health Organization considers safe. Yet the impact of sustained exposure to pollution on a person’s life expectancy has largely remained a vexingly unanswered question—until now.

Air pollution cuts three years off lifespans in northern China
September 11, 2017 03:54 PM - University of Chicago

There are currently an estimated 4.5 billion people around the world exposed to levels of particulate air pollution that are at least twice what the World Health Organization considers safe. Yet the impact of sustained exposure to pollution on a person’s life expectancy has largely remained a vexingly unanswered question—until now.

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