Pollution

Could renewable 'power-by-wire' help fix China's air pollution problems?
June 19, 2017 04:26 PM - IOP Publishing

Bringing renewable power ‘by wire’ from western China to its power-hungry Eastern cities could have benefits for both local air quality and global climate change, new research has found.

The study, published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters, examined if ongoing power transmission capacity investment in China – driven largely by concerns over air pollution – could also reduce local adverse health impacts from air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Next-gen solvents capture carbon with half the energy
June 19, 2017 02:10 PM - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

U.S. energy production could increase with the help of an improved carbon capture technology that use about half the energy of today's standard technologies. Emissions captured at fossil fuel power plants could in turn be used to harvest more crude by injecting it into underground oil fields.

Plastic pollution in the Antarctic worse than expected
June 19, 2017 07:22 AM - British Antarctic Survey

The continent is considered to be a pristine wilderness compared to other regions and was thought to be relatively free from plastic pollution. However new findings by scientists from University of Hull and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have revealed that recorded levels of microplastics are five times higher than you would expect to find from local sources such as research stations and ships.

Researchers find way to reduce environmental impact of idling buses and delivery trucks
June 16, 2017 11:49 AM - University of Waterloo

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a system for service vehicles that could reduce emissions and save companies and governments millions of dollars per year in fuel costs.

In a study recently published in Energy, Waterloo engineers found a way to capture waste energy from service vehicles, such as buses or refrigerated food delivery trucks, as they are slowing down.

They also figured out how to use that energy to replace the fossil fuels that are currently needed to operate secondary systems, such as air conditioning or refrigeration units, when the vehicles are stopped and idling.

Researchers find way to reduce environmental impact of idling buses and delivery trucks
June 16, 2017 11:49 AM - University of Waterloo

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a system for service vehicles that could reduce emissions and save companies and governments millions of dollars per year in fuel costs.

In a study recently published in Energy, Waterloo engineers found a way to capture waste energy from service vehicles, such as buses or refrigerated food delivery trucks, as they are slowing down.

They also figured out how to use that energy to replace the fossil fuels that are currently needed to operate secondary systems, such as air conditioning or refrigeration units, when the vehicles are stopped and idling.

NOAA, USGS and partners predict larger summer dead zone for the Chesapeake Bay
June 15, 2017 08:34 AM - USGS

Scientists expect this year’s summer Chesapeake Bay hypoxic or “dead zone” — an area of low to no oxygen that can kill fish and aquatic life — will be larger than average, approximately 1.89 cubic miles, or nearly the volume of 3.2 million Olympic-size swimming pools.

Measurements for the Bay’s dead zone go back to 1950, and the 30-year mean maximum dead zone volume is 1.74 cubic miles.

Wildfires Pollute Much More Than Previously Thought
June 14, 2017 11:12 AM - Georgia Institute of Technology

Summer wildfires boost air pollution considerably more than previously believed.

Naturally burning timber and brush launch what are called fine particles into the air at a rate three times as high as levels noted in emissions inventories at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study. The microscopic specks that form aerosols are a hazard to human health, particularly to the lungs and heart.

Wildfires Pollute Much More Than Previously Thought
June 14, 2017 11:12 AM - Georgia Institute of Technology

Summer wildfires boost air pollution considerably more than previously believed.

Naturally burning timber and brush launch what are called fine particles into the air at a rate three times as high as levels noted in emissions inventories at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study. The microscopic specks that form aerosols are a hazard to human health, particularly to the lungs and heart.

China's Air Pollution Sharply Limits CO2 Uptake by Plants on Large Scale, Study Shows
June 12, 2017 05:06 PM - Yale Environment 360

The exceptionally high levels of surface ozone, aerosol particles, and other air pollutants in China are damaging plants and interfering with their ability to absorb carbon dioxide, according to a new study.

Researchers at the University of Exeter in the UK said that elevated levels of these pollutants in many parts of China are oxidizing plant cells and weakening the process of leaf photosynthesis and CO2 uptake. The impact of the ozone damage is so widespread that it actually has an effect on the regional carbon balance and impedes efforts to reduce planet-warming greenhouse gases, according to the study, published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

China's Air Pollution Sharply Limits CO2 Uptake by Plants on Large Scale, Study Shows
June 12, 2017 05:06 PM - Yale Environment 360

The exceptionally high levels of surface ozone, aerosol particles, and other air pollutants in China are damaging plants and interfering with their ability to absorb carbon dioxide, according to a new study.

Researchers at the University of Exeter in the UK said that elevated levels of these pollutants in many parts of China are oxidizing plant cells and weakening the process of leaf photosynthesis and CO2 uptake. The impact of the ozone damage is so widespread that it actually has an effect on the regional carbon balance and impedes efforts to reduce planet-warming greenhouse gases, according to the study, published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

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