Sci/tech

Self-Portrait of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope Marks Critical Test
October 19, 2017 12:27 PM - NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

What appears to be a unique selfie opportunity was actually a critical photo for the cryogenic testing of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope in Chamber A at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The photo was used to verify the line of sight (or path light will travel) for the testing configuration.

WhatsApp Use by Argentina Ambulances Associated with Faster Heart Attack Treatment
October 19, 2017 11:52 AM - European Society of Cardiology

WhatsApp use by ambulance doctors in Argentina was associated with faster treatment of heart attack and lower mortality in an observational study presented today at the Argentine Congress of Cardiology (SAC 2017). The free messaging application was used to send diagnostic electrocardiograms (ECGs) directly to hospital catheterisation (cath) laboratories, enabling patients to bypass the emergency department.

Impact of Amazonian Hydropower is 'Significantly Underestimated', Study Finds
October 19, 2017 11:48 AM - University of Stirling

The environmental impact of hydropower generation in the Amazon may be greater than predicted, according to new University of Stirling research.

Space Greens Beat the Blues
October 19, 2017 11:40 AM - De Gruyter Open

Where people will go in the cosmos, plants will go. That’s the message of a paper entitled “Gardening for Therapeutic People-Plant Interactions during Long-Duration Space Missions” written by Raymond Odeh, and Charles L. Guy of the University of Florida (Gainesville) and published in the De Gruyter journal, Open Agriculture.

Space Greens Beat the Blues
October 19, 2017 11:40 AM - De Gruyter Open

Where people will go in the cosmos, plants will go. That’s the message of a paper entitled “Gardening for Therapeutic People-Plant Interactions during Long-Duration Space Missions” written by Raymond Odeh, and Charles L. Guy of the University of Florida (Gainesville) and published in the De Gruyter journal, Open Agriculture.

Itsy Bitsy Spider: Fear of Spiders and Snakes is Deeply Embedded in Us
October 19, 2017 11:34 AM - Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Snakes and spiders evoke fear and disgust in many people. Even in developed countries lots of people are frightened of these animals although hardly anybody comes into contact with them. Until now, there has been debate about whether this aversion is innate or learnt. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig and the Uppsala University have recently discovered that it is hereditary: Babies as young as six months old feel stressed when seeing these creatures—long before they could have learnt this reaction.

Itsy Bitsy Spider: Fear of Spiders and Snakes is Deeply Embedded in Us
October 19, 2017 11:34 AM - Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Snakes and spiders evoke fear and disgust in many people. Even in developed countries lots of people are frightened of these animals although hardly anybody comes into contact with them. Until now, there has been debate about whether this aversion is innate or learnt. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig and the Uppsala University have recently discovered that it is hereditary: Babies as young as six months old feel stressed when seeing these creatures—long before they could have learnt this reaction.

Scientists Solve a Magnesium Mystery in Rechargeable Battery Performance
October 19, 2017 10:54 AM - DOE / Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Rechargeable batteries based on magnesium, rather than lithium, have the potential to extend electric vehicle range by packing more energy into smaller batteries. But unforeseen chemical roadblocks have slowed scientific progress.

University of Guelph Technology Helping Monitor Health of All-Important Boreal Forest
October 19, 2017 08:15 AM - University of Guelph

The boreal forest is essential to Canada and the world, storing carbon, purifying water and air, and regulating climate. But keeping tabs on the health of this vulnerable biome has proven to be a painstaking and time-consuming undertaking – until now.

Cutting-edge DNA metabarcoding technology developed by the University of Guelph can help speed up and improve the monitoring process, according to a new study published today in Scientific Reports.

Illinois Sportfish Recovery a Result of 1972 Clean Water Act, Scientists Report
October 18, 2017 12:35 PM - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Populations of largemouth bass, bluegill, catfish and other sportfish are at the highest levels recorded in more than a century in the Illinois River, according to a new report. Their dramatic recovery, from populations close to zero near Chicago throughout much of the 20th century, began just after implementation of the Clean Water Act, the researchers say.

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