Sci/tech

Low-fat diet cuts ovarian cancer risk: study
October 9, 2007 06:25 PM - Will Dunham, Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A low-fat diet may protect women from ovarian cancer, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday.

Researchers tracked about 49,000 post-menopausal women from around the United States for about eight years. About 40 percent of them were asked to cut nearly in half the amount of fat in their diet. The others were asked to eat their usual diet.

No difference was seen in ovarian cancer risk in the first four years of the study. But in the final four years, the women who ate a diet lower in fat were 40 percent less likely to develop this cancer than the other women, the study found.

BitTorrent moves from piracy to video streaming
October 9, 2007 04:30 PM - Jim Finkle

BOSTON (Reuters) - BitTorrent Inc., which was co-founded by the developer of a software program widely used to share pirated music and video over the Web, plans to start helping media companies stream videos over the Internet.

The company unveiled the service on Tuesday, six years after its chief executive, Bram Cohen, created the BitTorrent peer-to-peer file-sharing technology.

BitTorrent is one of two key technologies used for trading files over the Web. The other, Gnutella, works using software programs including Limewire and MP3 Rocket.

Japan plans unmanned mission to the moon
October 9, 2007 11:07 AM -

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan plans to launch its first mission to land a spacecraft on the moon in the next decade, officials said on Tuesday, joining China and India in a race among Asian nations to explore the lunar surface.

Japan's first lunar orbiter is currently circling the moon, and the country is racing with China and India to land a craft on the lunar surface -- a feat so far achieved only by the former Soviet Union and the United States.

"We are aiming to carry out the project in the middle of the 2010s. It will examine geological features of the moon as well as natural resources available there," said an official from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

Physics Nobel Goes to German, Frenchman
October 9, 2007 07:51 AM - Associated Press

France's Albert Fert and German Peter Gruenberg won the 2007 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for a discovery that lets billions of computer users store reams of data on computer hard drives.

The technology "can also be considered one of the first real applications of the promising field of nanotechnology," which deals with extremely small devices, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in its citation.

UW undergrads discover more than 1,300 asteroids
October 9, 2007 07:37 AM - University of Washington

New Study Shows Genetically Engineered Corn Could Pollute Aquatic Ecosystems
October 8, 2007 06:56 PM -

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- A study by an Indiana University environmental science professor and several colleagues suggests a widely planted variety of genetically engineered corn has the potential to harm aquatic ecosystems. The study is being published this week by the journal Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences.

Researchers, including Todd V. Royer, an assistant professor in the IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs, established that pollen and other plant parts containing toxins from genetically engineered Bt corn are washing into streams near cornfields.

They also conducted laboratory trials that found consumption of Bt corn byproducts produced increased mortality and reduced growth in caddisflies, aquatic insects that are related to the pests targeted by the toxin in Bt corn.

Scientists create “interspecies” animal using embryonic stem cells
October 8, 2007 06:37 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

Liverpool, UK - Embrionic stem (ES) cells from a wood mouse into the early embryo of a house mouse, an international team of scientists has produced normal healthy animals made up a mixture of cells from each the two distantly related species. This is the first time that stem cells from one mammalian species have been shown to contribute extensively to development when introduced into the embryo of another, very different species.

Multiwavelength images of distant universe now available on Google Sky
October 8, 2007 04:04 PM -

Santa Cruz, California -  A massive project to map a distant region of the Universe in multiple wavelengths--from x-rays through ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and radio waves--is releasing its data this week to both fellow scientists and the general public. It is the first data release from the AEGIS survey and the  first release of multiwavelength data to take advantage of the capabilities of Google Sky, a new feature of Google Earth.

Why Do Males and Females Frequently Differ in Body Size and Structure?
October 8, 2007 03:58 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

RIVERSIDE, Calif. - Males and females frequently differ in body size, form and structure. But how did these differences develop? Despite decades of study by evolutionary biologists - the answer isn't clear.

A new book called Sex, Size & Gender Roles: Evolutionary Studies of Sexual Size Dimorphism (Oxford University Press, 2007). brings together the latest research findings in evolutionary biology to help explain gender differences in a variety of organisms, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, insects, spiders and flowering plants. The book was edited in part by a UC Riverside biology professor Daphne Fairbairn.

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