Sci/tech

Take ENN Reader Survey, Enter in a Chance to Win a Free iPad!!
April 27, 2010 05:41 PM - Roger Greenway, ENN

ENN is looking at ways we can improve our website to better serve you. Please take 5 minutes to complete a user survey to help us. The results of our user survey will help us see which parts of our current site are most valuable to you, and which ones you may find less useful. Going forward, we will keep what is working, and make some changes to incorporate new elements that people want. We appreciate that your time is very valuable, and are giving away an Apple iPad as a thank you to one lucky person who completes the survey. The lucky winner can use the iPad to check the news on ENN from any wi-Fi hotspot. It may also be useful for other tasks. The survey will run for a month, and the winner will be announced after the end of the survey period. To participate in the survey and to enter the iPad drawing, visit this link: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ENN

Sea Wind Power
April 27, 2010 04:43 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

To this date there is not a single offshore wind turbine been built in the United States. Meanwhile Europe, China and Japan are far along in developing a water based wind power industry. All one needs is a strong and steady wind as well as a relatively easy way to connect o the power grid so as to transmit the power gained from the wind. Most people think of wind power from various land based operations. However, it can be done by basing the wind turbine in the sea.

Of Brains, Worms and Chips
April 26, 2010 05:10 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

The brain, in some ways, is simply the biological device that keeps a body running and the mind thinking. In that way it is like a computer. An international team of scientists has discovered striking similarities between the human brain, the nervous system of a worm, and a computer chip. The finding is reported in the journal PloS Computational Biology today.

Scientists find fastest deep ocean current near Antarctica
April 26, 2010 05:51 AM - David Fogarty, Reuters

Scientists have discovered a fast-moving deep ocean current with the volume of 40 Amazon Rivers near Antarctica that will help researchers monitor the impacts of climate change on the world's oceans. A team of Australian and Japanese scientists, in a study published in Sunday's issue of the journal Nature Geoscience, found that the current is a key part of a global ocean circulation pattern that helps control the planet's climate. Scientists had previously detected evidence of the current but had no data on it.

Time Travel
April 23, 2010 04:39 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

What is time? One of the earliest concepts proposed is that is simply the fourth dimension, another direction. Humans travel daily one way into the future. Science fiction writers have long been obsessed with the subject from the legendary "The Time Machine" by HG Wells to the the Doctor Who series about the last time lord and his adventures. From summer blockbusters to sensational science headlines, modern culture is constantly inundated with tales of time travel. But when you boil down the physics involved, is it possible to travel through time?

Earth Day 2010
April 22, 2010 03:43 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

What is Earth Day? It has spread and is celebrated all over the world. Earth Day is a day designed to inspire awareness and appreciation for the Earth's environment. It was founded by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson as an environmental teach-in held on April 22, 1970. Earth Day is celebrated in the spring in the Northern Hemisphere and autumn in the Southern Hemisphere. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will hold free events for the public on the National Mall this weekend to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. The events will feature interactive, fun and educational exhibits related to environmental protection.

Smells and Aging
April 21, 2010 01:23 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

Smell is one of the five senses. It is how we interact with the world. What does the smell of a good meal mean to you? What are good smells and what are bad smells? Are there effects beyond just being pleasant or unpleasant? Specific odors that represent food or indicate danger may be capable of altering an animal's lifespan and physiological profile by activating a small number of highly specialized sensory neurons, researchers at the University of Michigan, University of Houston, and Baylor College of Medicine have shown in a study publishing by the end of April in the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology.

Ocean salinities show an intensified water cycle
April 21, 2010 09:07 AM - Craig Macaulay, CSIRO Australia

Evidence that the world's water cycle has already intensified is contained in new research to be published in the American Journal of Climate. The stronger water cycle means arid regions have become drier and high rainfall regions wetter as atmospheric temperature increases.

Saturn Lightning!
April 20, 2010 12:51 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

Imagine an electrical storm larger than the continental United States in which the lightning bolts are more than 1,000 times stronger than conventional lightning, and you'll have a good idea of what can transpire on Saturn. NASA's Cassini spacecraft has recently captured images of lightning on Saturn. The images have allowed scientists to create the first movie showing lightning flashing on another planet. After waiting years for Saturn to dim enough for the spacecraft's cameras to detect bursts of light, scientists were able to create the movie, complete with a soundtrack that features the crackle of radio waves emitted when lightning bolts struck.

Biggest mass of living things in the oceans? Microbes.
April 19, 2010 06:30 AM - Alister Doyle, Reuters

The ocean depths are home to myriad species of microbes, mostly hard to see but including spaghetti-like bacteria that form whitish mats the size of Greece on the floor of the Pacific, scientists said on Sunday. The survey, part of a 10-year Census of Marine Life, turned up hosts of unknown microbes, tiny zooplankton, crustaceans, worms, burrowers and larvae, some of them looking like extras in a science fiction movie and underpinning all life in the seas. "In no other realm of ocean life has the magnitude of Census discovery been as extensive as in the world of microbes," said Mitch Sogin of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, head of the marine microbe census.

First | Previous | 341 | 342 | 343 | 344 | 345 | Next | Last