Sci/tech

Loosing more than we gain from Autumn warming in the north
January 2, 2008 02:04 PM -

Gif-sur-Yvette, France - An international study investigating the carbon sink capacity of northern terrestrial ecosystems discovered that the duration of the net carbon uptake period (CUP) has on average decreased due to warmer autumn temperatures.

European conference aims to create global commodity market for non-GM soy and feed
January 2, 2008 01:15 PM -

Brussels, Belgium - Ensuring a reliable, global supply of non-GM soy for feed was the focus of a two-day conference held in December in Brussels, Belgium. The conference, “Non-GM Feedstuffs, Quality Productions and European Regional Agricultures’ Strategy,” was organized by Europe’s GMO-Free Regions Network and the European Committee of Regions, which hosted the event at its Brussels headquarters.

Red Planet Still Packs Surprises
January 2, 2008 11:59 AM - By Phil Berardelli -ScienceNOW Daily News

Even though orbiters have eyed it from space and landers have rumbled across its surface, Mars still has more secrets to reveal. Two findings emerged this week: the possibility of an active glacier far from the planet's poles and evidence that sulfur--not carbon--was the element driving the planet's warmer climate long ago. Both discoveries could force some rethinking about martian evolution and dynamics--and maybe even provide insights about Earth's past.

Researchers Reverse Effects Of Sleep Deprivation
January 2, 2008 11:44 AM - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

"These findings are significant because of their potential applicability," said Samuel A. Deadwyler, Ph.D., professor of physiology and pharmacology at Wake Forest. "This could benefit patients suffering from narcolepsy and other serious sleep disorders. But it also has applicability to shift workers, the military and many other occupations where sleep is often limited, yet cognitive demand remains high."

Study links ovarian cancer survival to gene change
January 2, 2008 10:55 AM - Reuters

Ashkenazi Jewish women who had changes in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes were 28 percent less likely to die from the disease over a follow-up period of up to nine years during the study even though such mutations increase the chances of developing breast or ovarian cancer in the first place, the researchers said.

Helium Supplies Endangered, Threatening Science And Technology
January 2, 2008 10:50 AM - Washington University in St. Louis.

The element that lifts things like balloons, spirits and voice ranges is being depleted so rapidly in the world's largest reserve, outside of Amarillo, Texas, that supplies are expected to be depleted there within the next eight years. This deflates more than the Goodyear blimp and party favors. Its larger impact is on science and technology, according to Lee Sobotka, Ph.D., professor of chemistry and physics in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.

Insects' 'giant leap' reconstructed by founder of sociobiology
January 2, 2008 10:46 AM - American Institute of Biological Sciences

Wilson’s article surveys recent evidence that the high level of social organization called “eusociality,” found in some Hymenoptera (and rarely in other species), is a result of natural selection on nascent colonies of species possessing features that predispose them to colonial life. Wilson concludes that these features, principally progressive provisioning of larvae and behavioral flexibility that leads to division of labor, allow some species to evolve colonies that are maintained and defended because of their proximity to food sources.

Colon cancer risk traced to common ancestor
January 2, 2008 08:50 AM - Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) - A married couple who sailed to America from England around 1630 are the reason why thousands of people in the United States are at higher risk of a hereditary form of colon cancer, researchers said on Wednesday. Using a genetic fingerprint, a U.S. team traced back a so-called founder genetic mutation to the couple found among two large families currently living in Utah and New York.

Good News About Ocean Methane
January 1, 2008 10:21 PM - University of California, Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara, Calif. - Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is emitted in great quantities as bubbles from seeps on the ocean floor near Santa Barbara. About half of these bubbles dissolve into the ocean, but the fate of this dissolved methane remains uncertain.

Silence may lead to phantom noises misinterpreted as tinnitus
January 1, 2008 10:10 PM -

Brazil - Phantom noises, that mimic ringing in the ears associated with tinnitus, can be experienced by people with normal hearing in quiet situations, according to new research published in the January 2008 edition of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery.

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