Sci/tech

How many different dust particles are you breathing?
October 6, 2011 09:37 AM - David A Gabel, ENN

In any given room, even the most sterile scientific cleanrooms, there are dust particles in the air and coating every surface. If allowed to go uncleaned, the dust will accumulate to eventually cover every surface. But what exactly is the dust in the air and on our tables and shelves? A chemistry research team at the Ohio State University, using a new kind of sensor, has isolated and measured the composition of unique dust particles in their laboratory.

World’s Oldest Car Powered by Steam Heads to Auction
October 4, 2011 04:56 PM - Christopher DeMorro, Matter Network

We can probably debate what counts as the world’s first real automobile, since the De Dion Bouton Et Trepardoux Dos-A-Dos Steam Runabout is more of a train without tracks than an actual car. This over-named vehicle is up for auction, and ran not on gasoline that would come to define the car…but on steam power.

A Better Plastic
September 30, 2011 01:31 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

Researchers at the University of Leeds and Durham University have solved a long-standing problem that could revolutionize the way new plastics are developed. The breakthrough will allow experts to create the perfect plastic with specific uses and properties by using a high-tech 'recipe book'. It will also increase our ability to recycle plastics. The research is published in the journal Science.

Finding Planets
September 29, 2011 12:49 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

There are many worlds out there and NASA has a lot of data that it has not reviewed in the depth that is needed to search every star for its worlds and the evidence there of. A project in which volunteers hunt online for new planets NASA may have missed is publishing its first results which show some remarkable finds. Planethunters.org, which was set up by Oxford University physicists, working with colleagues at Yale University and the Adler Planetarium, has enabled over 45,000 armchair astronomers to find candidates for new alien worlds by searching data from the Kepler mission.

MIT Battery Startup Likes Liquidity
September 28, 2011 02:27 PM - Eric Lane, Clean Techies

The ’503 Application is entitled Alkaline Earth Metal Ion Battery and is directed to an alkaline earth metal ion energy storage cell (10) which contains three liquid constituents: two liquid electrodes and a liquid electrolyte. More particularly, the cell (10) houses a molten metal body (14) that serves as a negative electrode, an electronically conductive liquid alloy body (16) that serves as a positive electrode, and an intervening ionically conductive electrolyte (20).

WWF celebrates World Rhino Day
September 22, 2011 11:19 AM - WWF

On the occasion of the second annual World Rhino Day, WWF joins the residents of rhinoceros range countries in calling for an end to rhino poaching, which threatens the survival of rhino species. Officials in South Africa, home to most of the world's rhinos, have responded to the recent poaching crisis by increasing protection for rhinos, conducting more rigorous prosecutions, and imposing stricter sentences on wildlife criminals. This action must be met with a corresponding commitment by countries in Asia where consumer demand for rhino horn is inciting poachers. South Africa has lost at least 284 rhinos in 2011, including 16 or more critically endangered black rhinos. A majority of the poaching incidents have occurred in the world famous Kruger National Park, but privately owned rhinos have also been targeted. Law enforcement officials have made over 165 arrests so far during the year, and some convicted poachers have been sentenced to up to 12 years in prison.

How to run with wolves
September 21, 2011 04:59 PM - Deadly 60 team, BBC Earth

Traveling to the frozen north, Steve and his Deadly 60 team met an animal whose ability to survive in sub-zero temperatures, has made it one of many Norwegian success stories. But how close could they really get to this hardened predator? Well, sorry, you can't. No matter what the Twilight movie says! Wild wolves are extremely hard to get close to, and it's not sensible to try! They are top predators, the largest of the wild dog family living in complex social groups, in remote inhospitable places. They are incredibly hard to see and track in the wild, travelling over huge distances and running at speeds of over 30mph in pursuit of prey. They are ferocious hunters tackling prey many times their own size like elk, bison and musk ox. Wild wolves are not to be messed with.

Killer Asteroids
September 21, 2011 08:02 AM - Andy Soos, ENN

Observations from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission indicate the family of asteroids some believed was responsible for the demise of the dinosaurs is not likely the culprit, keeping open the case on one of Earth's greatest mysteries. While scientists are confident a large asteroid crashed into Earth approximately 65 million years ago, leading to the extinction of dinosaurs and some other life forms on our planet, they do not know exactly where the asteroid came from or how it made its way to Earth. A 2007 study using visible-light data from ground-based telescopes first suggested the remnant of a huge asteroid, known as Baptistina, as a possible suspect. The hunt for the killer asteroid goes on.

Radar could detect tsunamis more accurately
September 20, 2011 01:06 PM - Kafil Yamin, SciDevNet

A tsunami has been observed with radar for the first time, promising a cheap and more accurate early warning method, according to a study. Researchers have found that the devastating tsunami that hit Japan on 11 March could had been spotted up to 45 minutes before it reached tide gauges, using high-frequency radars installed along the shorelines in California and Japan.

Ancient Fossil Aquifers and NASA
September 19, 2011 07:54 AM - Andy Soos, ENN

A NASA-led team has used radar sounding technology developed to explore the subsurface of Mars to create high-resolution maps of freshwater aquifers buried deep beneath an Earth desert, in the first use of airborne sounding radar for aquifer mapping. The research may help scientists better locate and map Earth's desert aquifers, understand current and past hydrological conditions in Earth's deserts and assess how climate change is impacting them. Deserts cover roughly 20 percent of Earth's land surface, including highly populated regions in the Arabian Peninsula, North Africa (Sahara), west and central Asia (Takla Makan) and the southwestern United States (Sonora).

First | Previous | 346 | 347 | 348 | 349 | 350 | Next | Last