Sci/tech

A $15.8 Billion Organic Electronics Materials Market by 2015
December 19, 2007 12:29 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

GLEN ALLEN, Va. - The market for organic electronics materials will be worth $4.9 billion in 2012 surging to $15.8 billion in 2015, according to a new report from NanoMarkets, an industry analyst firm based here. The report, "Organic Harvest: Opportunities in Organic Electronic Materials" is the next in a series that analyzes the market for the semiconductors, conductors, dielectrics and substrates that will be used in the growing organic electronics industry. Details about the report can be found at www.nanomarkets.net. The firm has also released a blog entry that provides additional commentaries from the report at www.nanotopblog.com. Report summaries are available for members of the press upon request.

Hot Flashes: Soy Can Turn Down the Heat
December 19, 2007 11:28 AM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

ST. LOUIS, - As baby boomer women age into their menopausal years, new research demonstrates that soy isoflavones may offer them dietary relief from hot flashes. Baby boomer women account for approximately 25 percent of the total female population in the United States and as the youngest members of this generation enter their early forties, an unprecedented number of women will experience symptoms of menopause over the next few years.

U.S. trails other countries in air traffic management
December 19, 2007 10:08 AM - Indiana University Newswire

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- The United States lags behind other developed countries in the structure and financing of its air traffic control system. And its failure to adopt reforms may have serious consequences as air travel and air cargo continue to grow and the industry becomes an increasingly important part of the global economy. Those are among the findings of Managing the Skies: Public Policy, Organization and Financing of Air Navigation, a new book by Clinton V. Oster of Indiana University and John S. Strong of the College of William and Mary. It will be published in January by Ashgate Publishing in the United Kingdom.

Why Santa Claus is Chinese.
December 19, 2007 09:25 AM - Lester R. Brown

I know Santa Claus is Chinese because each Christmas morning after all the gifts are unwrapped and things settle down I systematically go through the presents to see where they are made. The results are almost always the same: roughly 70 percent are from China. After some research, it seems that my one-family survey is representative of the country as a whole. Let’s start with toys. Some 80 percent of the toys sold in the United States—from Barbie dolls to video games—are made in China. Talking toys that speak English learned the language from Chinese workers. Electronic goods—from Apple’s iPod to Microsoft’s Xbox—are made in China. Clothing—from the latest cashmere sweaters to gym suits—is also likely to have a “Made in China” label.

Green tea may cut prostate cancer risk: Japan study
December 19, 2007 09:03 AM - Reuters

TOKYO (Reuters) - Drinking green tea may reduce the risk of advanced prostate cancer, according to a study by researchers at Japan's National Cancer Center. It said men who drank five or more cups a day might halve the risk of developing advanced prostate cancer compared with those who drank less than one cup a day. "This does not mean that people who drink green tea are guaranteed to have reduced risk of advanced prostate cancer," said Norie Kurahashi, a scientist who took part in the study.

Pakistan says no threat of bird flu pandemic
December 19, 2007 08:59 AM - Reuters

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistan said on Wednesday there was no threat of a pandemic from bird flu, as World Health Organization experts visited the country's northwest which reported the first human death from the virus. Pakistani authorities confirmed at the weekend eight human bird flu cases, including the one death, that the WHO said were likely a combination of infections from poultry and limited person to person transmission due to close contact.

Why diving marine mammals resist brain damage from low oxygen
December 19, 2007 08:59 AM - University of California - Santa Cruz

SANTA CRUZ, CA-- No human can survive longer than a few minutes underwater, and even a well-trained Olympic swimmer needs frequent gulps of air. Our brains need a constant supply of oxygen, particularly during exercise. Contrast that with Weddell seals, animals that dive and hunt under the Antarctic sea ice. They hold their breath for as long as 90 minutes, and remain active and mentally alert the whole time. The seals aren't fazed at all by low levels of oxygen that would cause humans to black out. What's their secret"

Evolution tied to Earth movement
December 19, 2007 08:51 AM - University of Utah

Scientists long have focused on how climate and vegetation allowed human ancestors to evolve in Africa. Now, University of Utah geologists are calling renewed attention to the idea that ground movements formed mountains and valleys, creating environments that favored the emergence of humanity. “Tectonics [movement of Earth’s crust] was ultimately responsible for the evolution of humankind,” Royhan and Nahid Gani of the university’s Energy and Geoscience Institute write in the January, 2008, issue of Geotimes, published by the American Geological Institute.

Texas vows to attract other carbon-capture plants
December 18, 2007 06:59 PM - Reuters

HOUSTON (Reuters) - A Texas regulator said Tuesday that while the state was not able to land a $1.5 billion "near-zero" emission coal plant, he wants to find ways to attract other projects that seek to capture and store carbon dioxide, a gas blamed for global warming. Mattoon in central Illinois was named Tuesday as the home for the proposed FutureGen coal plant, beating out Jewett and Odessa, Texas, and another Illinois site in a national competition.

Pittsburgh's New Year's Ball Ornament Eco-Friendly
December 18, 2007 06:58 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

PITTSBURGH - Did you know that Pittsburghers ring in a green New Year? Again this year, Highmark's "The Future of Pittsburgh" ball, which is made from environmentally friendly materials, will light the sky in downtown Pittsburgh as part of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust's First Night celebration.

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