CU-Boulder signs $92 million contract for space weather instrument package
August 27, 2007 08:09 AM - University of Colorado at Boulder

The instrument package, which will be designed and built at CU-Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, is slated to launch on future generations of NOAA satellites known as the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, or GOES-R. Known as the Extreme Ultra Violet and X-Ray Irradiance Sensors, or EXIS, the LASP package will consist of an X-ray sensor to look at solar flares and an extreme UV sensor to monitor sunlight variation, both of which can disrupt communications and navigational accuracy of equipment and vehicles operating on land, sea and in the air and space.

Photon-transistors for the supercomputers of the future
August 27, 2007 07:49 AM - University of Copenhagen

Scientist from the Niels Bohr Institute at University of Copenhagen and from Harvard University have worked out a new theory which describe how the necessary transistors for the quantum computers of the future may be created. The research has just been published in the scientific journal Nature Physics. Researchers dream of quantum computers. Incredibly fast super computers which can solve such extremely complicated tasks that it will revolutionise the application possibilities. But there are some serious difficulties. One of them is the transistors, which are the systems that process the signals.

When is a stem cell not really a stem cell?
August 27, 2007 07:40 AM - Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions

Working with embryonic mouse brains, a team of Johns Hopkins scientists seems to have discovered an almost-too-easy way to distinguish between �true� neural stem cells and similar, but less potent versions. Their finding, reported this week in Nature, could simplify the isolation of stem cells not only from brain but also other body tissues.

Scientists To Launch Polar Grid Research With Massive Computer Network
August 25, 2007 06:29 PM - Indiana University

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Researchers from Indiana University create a cyberinfrastructure that will help scientists better understand the current and future state of polar ice sheets. The Polar Grid project will transform U.S. capabilities in ice sheet research. With this technology, it will be possible to collect, examine and analyze data -- and then use the results of such analysis to optimize data collection strategies -- all during the course of a single expedition. This will help scientists more quickly gain understanding about the potential impact of rising sea levels and how they relate to global climate change, a problem of urgent importance.

Low-Cost, High-Tech Way To Strengthen Deteriorating Bridges
August 24, 2007 06:36 PM - Ed Stiles, College of Engineering, University of Arizona

Tucson, Arizona - A University of Arizona engineering professor has developed an easy, low-cost way to strengthen thousands of aging steel and concrete bridges across the country. The technology could have prevented Minnesota's IH-35W bridge collapse and could be used to repair tens of thousands of substandard bridges, says Professor Hamid Saadatmanesh, of UA's Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Department.

Scientists Re-Trace Evolution Of Genes
August 24, 2007 05:08 PM - University of Oregon

EUGENE, Ore. — Scientists have determined for the first time the atomic structure of an ancient protein, revealing in unprecedented detail how genes evolved their functions. "Never before have we seen so clearly, so far back in time," said project leader Joe Thornton, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Oregon. "We were able to see the precise mechanisms by which evolution molded a tiny molecular machine at the atomic level, and to reconstruct the order of events by which history unfolded."

Cancer Drugs That Block Blood Vessel Growth From Inside Cells May Lead to Serious Long Term Health Problems
August 24, 2007 04:48 PM - UCLA

Los Angeles - Angiogenesis inhibitors, drugs that block a tumor's development of an independent blood supply, have been touted as effective cancer fighters that result in fewer side effects than traditional chemotherapy. However, a new study by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center has shown that one method of blocking blood-supply development could result in serious and potentially deadly side effects.

Hubble And Keck Gives New View Of Uranus' Rings
August 24, 2007 03:28 PM - Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley

BERKELEY — As the rings of Uranus swing edge-on to Earth - a short-lived view we get only once every 42 years - astronomers observing the event are getting an unprecedented, glare-free view of the rings and the fine dust that permeates them.

Sony Develops Sweet Little Bio Battery
August 24, 2007 07:28 AM - Reuters

Sony has developed an environmentally-friendly prototype battery that runs on sugars and that can generate enough electricity to power a music player and a pair of speakers, the Japanese company said.

Ancient Organisms Discovered in Canadian Gold Mine
August 23, 2007 09:00 AM - University of Illinois Chicago

Scientists have suspected that the three known domains of life -- eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea -- branched off and went their separate ways around three billion years ago. But pinning down the time of that split has been an elusive task.

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