Sci/tech

Strange and Curious Clouds
June 15, 2010 02:47 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

It is always nice to lie back and look up into the sky and watch the drifting patterns of clouds. However, some clouds are odder or weirder than others. Some were made by nature and some were made accidentally by the actions of man. As turboprop and jet aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground, new research finds. Through this seeding process, they leave behind odd shaped holes or channels in the clouds, which tend to be fascinating to see.

Painting a Wild Picture of North America
June 14, 2010 06:55 PM - Theodora Lamb, TheBigWild.org

"Do something small to save something big". That's The Big Wild's motto. In the world of wilderness conservation, connecting people to their ecological footprint is a big, wild challenge. The Big Wild is a conservation organization founded by Canada’s Mountain Equipment Co-op and the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. We represent conservation campaigns across the country that have reached their tipping point and need public input to help call on political representatives to protect Canada’s wilderness. We connect communities to conservation efforts across the country. What better way to measure how “wild” North America is than with an infographic?

Sunny with Some Spots
June 14, 2010 02:38 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

When observing the Sun, the most obvious visible features are usually its sunspots, which are well defined surface areas that appear darker than their surroundings because of lower temperatures. Sunspots are regions of intense magnetic activity where convection is inhibited by strong magnetic fields, reducing energy transport from the hot interior to the surface. The magnetic field causes strong heating in the corona, forming active regions that are the source of intense solar flares and coronal mass ejections. the number of such spots varies over time generally in a 11 year cycle. Right now the spots are mostly gone for about 2 years which is highly unusual and may portend dramatic solar events to come which will affect the whole earth.

How to Talk Dolphin
June 9, 2010 11:57 AM - Andy Soos, ENN

Humans have their difficulty communicating with each other in the same language. Using a different language multiplies the difficulties ten fold. Now dolphins have their own way of communicating and, at times, seem to vaguely understand humans. The scientific community had thought that whistles were the main sounds made by these mammals, and were unaware of the importance and use of burst pulsed sounds. Researchers from the Bottlenose Dolphin Research Institute (BDRI), based in Sardinia (Italy) have now shown that these sounds are vital to the animals' social life and mirror their behavior.

Solar Power Has Its Day
June 8, 2010 02:00 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

There is Sunday of course which was originally and literally Sun's day as a vaguely religious observance. Now there is Solar Day which is not so much a day set aside to honor solar (power) but a day to show how solar power has grown and can be used. This is to be June 19 and will be an annual day of recognition for the growth of clean, solar energy. The premise of Solar Day is simple: a national day of recognition for solar energy, energy independence and protection of the planet.

Into an Ancient Glacial Lake
June 8, 2010 01:07 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

Scientists have located the ideal drill site for the first ever exploration of an Antarctic sub-glacial lake, a development that it likely to facilitate a revolution in climate change research and which may lead to the discovery of life forms cut off from the main line of evolution for millions of years. Far below in the isolated dark strange life forms may have evolved isolated form the mainstream. Also down there are frozen relics of bygone ages and climates.

Take ENN Reader Survey by June 15, Enter in the Drawing for a Free iPad!!
June 4, 2010 03:50 PM - David A Gabel, ENN

The June 15 deadline for taking the ENN Reader Survey is rapidly approaching. Don't miss out on the chance to make your voice heard, tell us what you think, and win a new iPad! ENN is looking at ways we can improve our website to better serve you. Please take 5 minutes to complete a user survey to help us. The results of our user survey will help us see which parts of our current site are most valuable to you, and which ones you may find less useful. Going forward, we will keep what is working, and make some changes to incorporate new elements that people want. We appreciate that your time is very valuable, and are giving away an Apple iPad as a thank you to one lucky person who completes the survey. The lucky winner can use the iPad to check the news on ENN from any wi-Fi hotspot. It may also be useful for other tasks. The survey will conclude on June 15, and the winner will be announced shortly after the end of the survey period. Click on article link to find link to survey

How to Contain an Oil Spill
June 4, 2010 01:19 PM - Andy Soos, ENN

At present there is a large oil release in the Gulf of Mexico. It is not the first of its kind. Obviously one must try to confine it and then clean it up but what it is the right and effective way? What is a waste of time and resources and what works? Ixtoc I was an exploratory oil well being drilled in the Bay of Campeche of the Gulf of Mexico, about 62 northwest of Ciudad del Carmen, Campeche in waters 160 feet deep. On 3 June 1979, the well suffered a blowout resulting in the third largest oil spill and the second largest accidental spill in history. What was effective then? Under pressure from the Louisiana Governor and other state and local officials, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued an emergency permit on May 27 authorizing the state of Louisiana to construct 45 miles of artificial berm — 300 feet wide at its base and rising six feet out of the gulf — in an attempt to protect delta wetlands and barrier islands from the encroaching oil. How effective will this be?

Hubble catches stars on the move
June 4, 2010 08:54 AM - Colleen Sharkey, EurekAlert

With a mass of more than 10 000 suns packed into a volume with a diameter of a mere three light-years, the massive young star cluster in the nebula NGC 3603 is one of the most compact stellar clusters in the Milky Way [1] and an ideal place to test theories for their formation. A team of astronomers from the Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg and the University of Cologne led by Wolfgang Brandner (MPIA) wanted to track the movement of the cluster's many stars. Such a study could reveal whether the stars were in the process of drifting apart, or about to settle down.

Electric ash found in Eyjafjallajokull's plume, say UK researchers
June 3, 2010 09:33 AM - Joe Winters, EurekAlert

In the first peer-reviewed scientific paper to be published about the Icelandic volcano since its eruption in April 2010, UK researchers write that the ash plume which hovered over Scotland carried a significant and self-renewing electric charge. The volcano-chasing researchers argue this adds a further dimension to understanding the detailed nature of volcanic plumes and their effects on air travel.

First | Previous | 374 | 375 | 376 | 377 | 378 | Next | Last