Sci/tech

New Study Maps Space Dust in 3-D
March 22, 2017 05:08 PM - DOE / Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Consider that the Earth is just a giant cosmic dust bunny—a big bundle of debris amassed from exploded stars. We Earthlings are essentially just little clumps of stardust, too, albeit with very complex chemistry.

And because outer space is a very dusty place, that makes things very difficult for astronomers and astrophysicists who are trying to peer farther across the universe or deep into the center of our own galaxy to learn more about their structure, formation and evolution.

Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbours from birthing planets
March 22, 2017 11:48 AM - Imperial College London

Stars don't have to be massive to evaporate material from around nearby stars and affect their ability to form planets, a new study suggests.

Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbours from birthing planets
March 22, 2017 11:48 AM - Imperial College London

Stars don't have to be massive to evaporate material from around nearby stars and affect their ability to form planets, a new study suggests.

"Super sponge" promises effective toxic clean-up of lakes and more
March 22, 2017 11:43 AM - University of Minnesota

Mercury is very toxic and can cause long-term health damage, but removing it from water is challenging. To address this growing problem, University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Sciences (CFANS) Professor Abdennour Abbas and his lab team created a spongethat can absorb mercury from a polluted water source within seconds. Thanks to the application of nanotechnology, the team developed a sponge with outstanding mercury adsorption properties where mercury contaminations can be removed from tap, lake and industrial wastewater to below detectable limits in less than 5 seconds (or around 5 minutes for industrial wastewater). The sponge converts the contamination into a non-toxic complex so it can be disposed of in a landfill after use. The sponge also kills bacterial and fungal microbes.

"Geofencing" Shows Promise in Tracking Chronic Care
March 21, 2017 04:53 PM - Scott Maier via University of California - San Francisco

Location-tracking apps on smartphones could be used to help track and manage care for thousands of patients who suffer from chronic diseases, and possibly even provide feedback to them on lifestyle changes that could help, according to an initial assessment by researchers at UC San Francisco.

In the study, researchers provided a smartphone app to 3,443 participants age 18 and older from all 50 states. The app, which was developed by app developer Ginger.io in collaboration with study investigators, used “geofencing,” a location-based program that defines geographical boundaries. This app tracked participants when they entered a hospital and triggered a questionnaire when they were located in the hospital for more than four hours.

Futuristic Clock Prepared for Space
March 21, 2017 03:47 PM - Jet Propulsion Laboratory

No one keeps time quite like NASA.

Last month, the space agency's next-generation atomic clock was joined to the spacecraft that will take it into orbit in late 2017.

That instrument, the Deep Space Atomic Clock was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. On Feb. 17, JPL engineers monitored integration of the clock on to the Surrey Orbital Test Bed spacecraft at Surrey Satellite Technology in Englewood, Colorado.

A new, gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries
March 21, 2017 03:35 PM - Jim Shelton via Yale University

Yale scientists have developed an ultra-thin coating material that has the potential to extend the life and improve the efficiency of lithium-sulfur batteries, one of the most promising areas of energy research today.

In a study published online March 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers describe the new material — a dendrimer-graphene oxide composite film — which can be applied to any sulfur cathode. A cathode is the positive terminal on a battery.

"Flying saucer" quantum dots hold secret to brighter, better lasers
March 21, 2017 08:31 AM - University of Toronto

A research team led by University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering ‘squashes’ the shape of nanoparticles, enabling inexpensive lasers that emit light in a customized rainbow of colours

Sustainable Mineral Supply
March 20, 2017 03:32 PM - Karen B. Roberts via University of Delaware

International research team warns of mineral supply constraints as demand increases for green technologies

An international team of researchers, led by the University of Delaware’s Saleem Ali, says global resource governance and sharing of geoscience data is needed to address challenges facing future mineral supply.

Specifically of concern are a range of technology minerals, which are an essential ingredient in everything from laptops and cell phones to hybrid or electric cars to solar panels and copper wiring for homes. However, base metals like copper are also a matter of immense concern.

Running Delivery Trucks on Trolley Wires Isn't as Crazy as It Sounds
March 20, 2017 02:07 PM - Jack Stewart via Wired

ELECTRIC TRUCKS OFFER all the advantages of electric cars, namely, they’re greener. Trucks are a big source of the noxious emissions linked to smog and climate change. Minimizing the number of stinky, dirty diesels rumbling through town carries obvious public health benefits. But powering delivery trucks, let alone an 18-wheeler, with a big honkin’ battery simply isn’t practical. So engineers are taking another look at a century old solution: Stringing electrical cables over the road.

First | Previous | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | Next | Last