Sci/tech

You Can See That From Here: New Telescope Attachment Allows Ground-Based Observations of New Worlds to Rival Those From Space
October 6, 2017 01:32 PM - Penn State

A new, low-cost attachment to telescopes allows previously unachievable precision in ground-based observations of exoplanets -- planets beyond our solar system. With the new attachment, ground-based telescopes can produce measurements of light intensity that rival the highest quality photometric observations from space. Penn State astronomers, in close collaboration with the nanofabrication labs at RPC Photonics in Rochester, New York, created custom “beam-shaping” diffusers -- carefully structured micro-optic devices that spread incoming light across an image -- that are capable of minimizing distortions from the Earth’s atmosphere that can reduce the precision of ground-based observations. A paper describing the effectiveness of the diffusers appears online on October 5, 2017, in the Astrophysical Journal.

You Can See That From Here: New Telescope Attachment Allows Ground-Based Observations of New Worlds to Rival Those From Space
October 6, 2017 01:32 PM - Penn State

A new, low-cost attachment to telescopes allows previously unachievable precision in ground-based observations of exoplanets -- planets beyond our solar system. With the new attachment, ground-based telescopes can produce measurements of light intensity that rival the highest quality photometric observations from space. Penn State astronomers, in close collaboration with the nanofabrication labs at RPC Photonics in Rochester, New York, created custom “beam-shaping” diffusers -- carefully structured micro-optic devices that spread incoming light across an image -- that are capable of minimizing distortions from the Earth’s atmosphere that can reduce the precision of ground-based observations. A paper describing the effectiveness of the diffusers appears online on October 5, 2017, in the Astrophysical Journal.

Heating Dirt Could Cause a Runaway Rise in Carbon Emissions
October 6, 2017 01:24 PM - Eric Niiler via Wired

Tucked into the apple-growing hills of Western Massachusetts is the Harvard Forest, a 3,700-acre wooded preserve that hosts school kids on field trips, day-tripping hikers, and, for more than a quarter century, a highly unusual science experiment.

Group Tests Topical Treatment Strategy for Fighting Skin Cancer
October 6, 2017 01:20 PM - Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP), in Brazil, are testing a technique in mice that combines low-intensity electric current with a formulation containing nanoencapsulated chemotherapy to treat skin cancer. 

Electron Behaviour Under Extreme Conditions Described for the First Time
October 6, 2017 11:50 AM - Imperial College London

Researchers have modelled the actions of electrons under extreme temperatures and densities, such as those found within planets and stars.

Electron Behaviour Under Extreme Conditions Described for the First Time
October 6, 2017 11:50 AM - Imperial College London

Researchers have modelled the actions of electrons under extreme temperatures and densities, such as those found within planets and stars.

Study finds any activity—from workouts to housework—is good for the heart
October 6, 2017 11:47 AM - Simon Fraser University

An international team of scientists, led by SFU health sciences professor Scott Lear, has found that physical activity of any kind—from gym workouts to housecleaning —can help prevent heart disease and even death.

New Report on Channel Bed Erosion Helps Assess Bridge Stability in St. Louis
October 6, 2017 11:47 AM - USGS

A new assessment of channel bed erosion near 13 highway bridges in the greater St. Louis, Missouri, area is now available in an online report from the U.S. Geological Survey, produced in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation.

Plant Cells Survive But Stop Dividing Upon DNA Damage
October 6, 2017 11:40 AM - Nara Institute of Science and Technology

The cell cycle is the system through which a cell grows and divides. It is also how a cell passes its DNA to its progeny and is why the cell cycle ceases if the DNA is damaged, as otherwise it risks passing this damage to daughter cells. Scientists at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) have reported a new molecular mechanism that explains how this cessation occurs. The study, which can be read in Nature Communications, shows the transcription factor family MYB3R prevents progression to the division stage (M phase) of the cell cycle in Arabidopsis, a small flowering plant that is a member of the mustard family.

Plant Cells Survive But Stop Dividing Upon DNA Damage
October 6, 2017 11:40 AM - Nara Institute of Science and Technology

The cell cycle is the system through which a cell grows and divides. It is also how a cell passes its DNA to its progeny and is why the cell cycle ceases if the DNA is damaged, as otherwise it risks passing this damage to daughter cells. Scientists at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) have reported a new molecular mechanism that explains how this cessation occurs. The study, which can be read in Nature Communications, shows the transcription factor family MYB3R prevents progression to the division stage (M phase) of the cell cycle in Arabidopsis, a small flowering plant that is a member of the mustard family.

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