Sci/tech

Changes in Earth's Crust Caused Oxygen to Fill the Atmosphere
September 18, 2017 11:38 AM - University of British Columbia

Scientists have long wondered how Earth’s atmosphere filled with oxygen. UBC geologist Matthijs Smit and research partner Klaus Mezger may have found the answer in continental rocks that are billions of years old.

Changes in Earth's Crust Caused Oxygen to Fill the Atmosphere
September 18, 2017 11:38 AM - University of British Columbia

Scientists have long wondered how Earth’s atmosphere filled with oxygen. UBC geologist Matthijs Smit and research partner Klaus Mezger may have found the answer in continental rocks that are billions of years old.

Urgent Emission Reductions Needed to Achieve 1.5°C Warming Limit
September 18, 2017 11:34 AM - University of Oxford

Significant emission reductions are required if we are to achieve one of the key goals of the Paris Agreement, and limit the increase in global average temperatures to 1.5°C; a new Oxford University partnership warns.

NASA Sees Talim Now Extra-Tropical
September 18, 2017 11:29 AM - NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Tropical Storm Talim made landfall on Kyushu, the large island of southwestern Japan, where it weakened to an extra-tropical storm. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the storm after its transition.

Changes in Nonextreme Precipitation May Have Not-So-Subtle Consequences
September 18, 2017 11:27 AM - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Major floods and droughts receive a lot of attention in the context of climate change, but University of Illinois researchers analyzed over five decades of precipitation data from North America to find that changes in nonextreme precipitation are more significant than previously realized and larger than those in extreme precipitation. These changes can have a strong effect on ecosystems, agriculture, infrastructure design and resource management, and point to a need to examine precipitation in a more nuanced, multifaceted way.

NOAA teams with Paul G. Allen Philanthropies to expand deep ocean observations
September 18, 2017 07:58 AM - NOAA

In a groundbreaking public-private partnership, Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Paul G. Allen and NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory will deploy a large array of new deep ocean floats to expand ocean observations in a key area of the western South Atlantic Ocean.

These instruments, called Deep Argo floats, can collect data down to nearly four miles deep, and promise to lead scientists to a better understanding of how the bottom half of the ocean may influence long term weather, climate, and sea level rise.

Small-scale fisheries have big impact on oceans
September 18, 2017 07:58 AM - University of British Columbia (UBC)

A new UBC study has found that small-scale fisheries may have a much larger impact on ocean ecosystems than previously thought, due to a lack of data on their development over time.

“We found that the influence from small-scale fisheries is far from small,” said Jennifer Selgrath, lead author who completed the research as a PhD student with UBC’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries and Project Seahorse. “In our case study in the Philippines, we found that the fisheries have become unsustainable because there are so many people trying to catch a limited number of fish and invertebrates.”

NASA-NOAA's Satellite Night-time Nod to Norma
September 15, 2017 02:46 PM - NASA / Goddard Space Flight Center

Infrared imagery provides a look at tropical cyclones at night and NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite got a look at Tropical Storm Norma in the Eastern Pacific using infrared light.

Study shows electronic health information exchanges could cut billions in Medicare spending
September 15, 2017 02:28 PM - University of Notre Dame

Spending on entitlement programs like Medicare and Medicaid consumes some two-thirds of all federal spending, but new research from the University of Notre Dame shows that information technology investments in health care lead to significant spending reductions — potentially in the billions of dollars.

New Method for Identifying Carbon Compounds Derived from Fossil Fuels
September 15, 2017 01:54 PM - National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a laboratory instrument that can measure how much of the carbon in many carbon-containing materials was derived from fossil fuels. This will open the way for new methods in the biofuels and bioplastics industries, in scientific research, and environmental monitoring. Among other things, it will allow scientists to measure how much of the carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere came from burning fossil fuels, and to estimate fossil fuel emissions in an area as small as a city or as large as a continent.

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