Sustainability

20,000th LEED Project is Certified
December 24, 2013 12:16 PM - Green Building Law Update via, Clean Techies

Earlier this month, while few people were watching, the 20,000th LEED commercial project was certified! Wow. In the event you missed the huge happening on December 4th, it is a LEED 2009 Commercial Interior Certified project in Knoxville, Tennessee. This green tenant improvement portends enormous business opportunities associated with the U.S. Green Building Council and the existing built environment.

A little less coal for China
December 24, 2013 09:02 AM - Kieran Cooke, Ecologist

Coal mining companies in Australia have been enjoying the good life in recent years, making millions of dollars from feeding the seemingly insatiable energy appetites of Asia's tiger economies - particularly that of China. But a new report by the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment (SSEE) at Oxford in the UK warns that Australia's coal mining party could be coming to an end.

Out with the old and in with the new--light bulbs that is!
December 23, 2013 09:25 AM - Robin Blackstone, ENN

As of January 1, 2014, 60 and 40 watt incandescent bulbs will no longer be manufactured or sold in the United States. Retailers will sell out what is on their shelves and not restock incandescents. George W. Bush signed the phase-out, which was called for by The Energy Independence and National Security Act, in 2007. The bill also includes improvements in energy efficiency for lighting and appliances many of which have been in stores for several years.

Climate change and livestock
December 21, 2013 07:46 AM - Roger Greenway, ENN

Climate change, and man's role in it is being extensively studied by universities and government agencies around the world. The impact of ruminant livestock has been studied, but the effects of livestock emissions may have been underestimated. A team of international scientists, including Oregon State University Professor William Ripple concludes that while climate change negotiators struggle to agree on ways to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, they have paid inadequate attention to other greenhouse gases associated with livestock, according to an analysis by an international research team. A reduction in non-CO2 greenhouse gases will be required to abate climate change, the researchers said. Cutting releases of methane and nitrous oxide, two gases that pound-for-pound trap more heat than does CO2, should be considered alongside the challenge of reducing fossil fuel use.

Brown trout crowding out native brook trout
December 20, 2013 08:50 AM - Editor, ENN

Native brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, populations could be at risk as a result of the introduction of Brown trout, Salmo trutta, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study. Both species are valuable sport fish that coexist in many parts of the world due to stocking introductions.

Top conservation threats and opportunities
December 20, 2013 08:00 AM - Tamera Jones, Planet Earth Online

Governments being forced to choose between preventing climate change or averting a financial crisis, carbon solar cells as an alternative source of energy and accelerated loss of rhinos and elephants are among 15 conservation issues scientists say may become significant in 2014. Other threats and opportunities include emerging snake fungal disease, exploitation of Antarctica by nations such as China and Russia, and using synthetic biology to resurrect extinct species.

Good news for corn farmers worth millions of dollars
December 19, 2013 12:01 PM - Sara LaJeunesse, Penn State

Good news for corn farmers: a major corn crop pest, the European corn borer (ECB) has seen a significant population decline in the eastern United States. This information comes from Penn State researchers on the heels of reports of similar population declines in the Midwest. As a result, farmers will save millions of dollars in some parts of the country because they will no longer need to treat for this pest.

More than 40% of Scotland's energy demand is now met by renewables
December 19, 2013 09:18 AM - ClickGreen Staff, ClickGreen

Scotland’s renewable electricity output has reached record-high levels, according to official statistics released today. The figures, published by the Department of Energy and Climate Change, show that renewables met a record-breaking 40.3 per cent of gross electricity consumption in 2012, confirming that Scotland is on track to meet its interim target of 50% by 2015.

Damming the Congo
December 18, 2013 09:42 AM - Robin Blackstone, ENN

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is looking to capture the more of powers of the Congo River in what will be the largest and most powerful hydroelectric dam in the world. The Grand Inga Hydropower Project will produce up to 40,000 megawatts of electricity, doubling current dam champion, Three Gorges in China. The dam will generate more than one third of the electricity currently produced in Africa as it captures the force of the 1.5 million cubic feet per second cascading into the Atlantic Ocean.

Adorable Seal pups orphaned in England
December 18, 2013 07:40 AM - Kristina Chew, Care2

A record tidal surge that caused severe flooding and "war zone"-like damage in Norfolk, England has washed up and stranded 100 seal pups, many less than three weeks old. Staff at the the RSPCA's East Winch Wildlife Center says that each pup could require up to five months of rehabilitation. Fortunately, many generous souls have responded to an appeal for funds to help care for the orphaned pups. So far, the center has received £25,000 (about $40,773) to help care for them.

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