Sustainability

South Carolina oyster farming: One man finds success on the half shell
September 28, 2017 08:04 AM - NOAA

As a young Marine stationed in South Carolina in 1981, Frank Roberts recognized that the state’s low country was ideal for oyster farming. His family harvested oysters in the Chesapeake Bay and Long Island Sound, and he had a hunch it would work in South Carolina too.

Roberts eventually started his own oyster farm in South Carolina — making a key contribution to a growing nationwide aquaculture trend worth $1.3 billion (2014 figure), with some help from NOAA.  

Biochemists discover mechanism that helps flu viruses evolve
September 26, 2017 05:37 PM - Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Influenza viruses mutate rapidly, which is why flu vaccines have to be redesigned every year. A new study from MIT sheds light on just how these viruses evolve so quickly, and offers a potential way to slow them down.

Sustainable Engineering Solutions for Water and Energy
September 26, 2017 08:18 AM - Carleton University

Onita Basu still vividly remembers the exact moment she decided to devote her career to sustainable water solutions and practices.

“I was in a second-year Chemical Engineering lab working with a solution of water that looked relatively clean,” she recalls. “When I passed the water through a treatment process I was shocked to see an incredible amount of dissolved copper emerge from the solution and begin coating onto various surfaces. It was an eye-opening experience to realize that we cannot always tell what is in our water.”

Going diving in the tropics? Don't eat the reef fish!
September 26, 2017 08:18 AM - University of British Columbia (UBC)

Reducing tourist consumption of reef fish is critical for Palau’s ocean sustainability, finds a new UBC study that suggests other small island nations might also consider adopting this strategy.

Climate change is expected to lead to sharp declines in Palau’s reefs, and this new research suggests that the best tourism management strategy includes a more than 70 per cent reduction in the amount of reef fish eaten by visitors. These findings are relevant for sustainable development for other small island developing states that are likely to feel a significant impact from changes to the ocean.

Technique spots warning signs of extreme events
September 22, 2017 04:59 PM - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Many extreme events — from a rogue wave that rises up from calm waters, to an  instability inside a gas turbine, to the sudden extinction of a previously hardy wildlife species — seem to occur without warning. It’s often impossible to predict when such bursts of instability will strike, particularly in systems with a complex and ever-changing mix of players and pieces.

USDA-funded study finds no-tillage alone not sufficient to prevent water pollution from nitrate
September 22, 2017 04:50 PM - Indiana University

A new IUPUI study funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture answers a long-debated agricultural question: whether no-tillage alone is sufficient to prevent water pollution from nitrate. The answer is no.

We must accelerate transitions for sustainability and climate change, experts say
September 22, 2017 01:39 PM - University of Sussex

We must move faster towards a low-carbon world if we are to limit global warming to 2 degrees C this century, experts have warned.

When residents take charge of their rainforests, fewer trees die
September 20, 2017 04:09 PM - Ohio State University

When the government gives citizens a personal stake in forested land, trees don’t disappear as quickly and environmental harm slows down.

Small-scale fisheries have big impact on oceans
September 18, 2017 07:58 AM - University of British Columbia (UBC)

A new UBC study has found that small-scale fisheries may have a much larger impact on ocean ecosystems than previously thought, due to a lack of data on their development over time.

“We found that the influence from small-scale fisheries is far from small,” said Jennifer Selgrath, lead author who completed the research as a PhD student with UBC’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries and Project Seahorse. “In our case study in the Philippines, we found that the fisheries have become unsustainable because there are so many people trying to catch a limited number of fish and invertebrates.”

IU discovery could reduce nuclear waste with improved method to chemically engineer molecules
September 15, 2017 11:39 AM - Indiana University

A discovery by Indiana University researchers could advance the long-term storage of nuclear waste, an increasingly burdensome and costly task for the public and private agencies that protect people from these harmful chemicals.

First | Previous | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | Next | Last