Top Stories

Study Finds People with Certain Blood Types Have Increased Risks of Heart Attack During Periods of High Air Pollution
November 15, 2017 01:13 PM - Jess Gomez

Individuals who have A, B, or AB blood types have an elevated risk of having a heart attack during periods of significant air pollution, compared to those with the O blood type, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute and Brigham Young University.

The new study is unique in that it links increased risk of heart attack associated with small particulate pollution to increased risk of heart attack for people with certain blood types who have coronary artery disease.

NASA Measures Haikui's Remnant Rainfall Over Southern Vietnam
November 15, 2017 12:32 PM - NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided data on rainfall over Vietnam from the remnants of former Tropical Storm Haikui.

Amazon's Recovery Limited by Climate Change
November 15, 2017 12:20 PM - University of Edinburgh

Deforested areas of the Amazon Basin have a limited ability to recover because of recent changes in climate, a study shows.

Scripps Scientists Use Photomosaic Technology to Find Order in the Chaos of Coral Reefs
November 15, 2017 11:47 AM - University of California - San Diego

In a study published recently in Coral Reefs, scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego created and analyzed detailed photomosaics of the coral reef at Palmyra Atoll, and made surprising discoveries around coral spatial ecology. The scientists, led by graduate student Clinton Edwards, canvassed more than 17,000 square feet of reef, and 44,008 coral colonies, taking more than 39,000 images that were then stitched together to create 3D photomosaics that encompassed the reef. 

Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceuticals & personal care products impact aquatic life
November 15, 2017 11:41 AM - Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Traditional toxicity testing underestimates the risk that pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution poses to freshwater ecosystems. Criteria that account for ecological disruption – not just organism death – are needed to protect surface waters, which are under pressure from a growing population and escalating synthetic chemical use. So reports a new study published this week in Elementa.

FIREBIRD II and NASA Mission Locate Whistling Space Electrons' Origins
November 15, 2017 11:36 AM - NASA / Goddard Space Flight Center

Scientists have long known that solar-energized particles trapped around the planet are sometimes scattered into Earth’s upper atmosphere where they can contribute to beautiful auroral displays. Yet for decades, no one has known exactly what is responsible for hurling these energetic electrons on their way. Recently, two spacecraft found themselves at just the right places at the right time to witness first hand both the impulsive electron loss and its cause.

How to Keep Cows Happy
November 15, 2017 11:33 AM - Springer

Corrals are used on livestock farms around the world to round up the animals when they need to be weighed or vaccinated. New research now shows that removing splashes of colors, shadows or water puddles from corrals, keeping noise levels down and not using dogs and electric prods can dramatically reduce the stress cattle experience. Maria Lúcia Pereira Lima of the Instituto de Zootecnia Sertãozinho in Brazil is the lead author of this study in Springer’s journal Tropical Animal Health and Production.

Artificial sweeteners in groundwater indicate contamination from septic systems
November 15, 2017 11:30 AM - University of Waterloo

The presence of artificial sweeteners in rural groundwater shows evidence for contamination by local septic system wastewater, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found.

Off Track: How Storms Will Veer in a Warmer World
November 15, 2017 11:29 AM - Weizmann Institute of Science

Under global climate change, the Earth’s climatic zones will shift toward the poles. This is not just a future prediction; it is a trend that has already been observed in the past decades. The dry, semi-arid regions are expanding into higher latitudes, and temperate, rainy regions are migrating poleward. In a paper that that was recently published in Nature Geoscience, Weizmann Institute of Science researchers provide new insight into this phenomenon by discovering that mid-latitude storms are steered further toward the poles in a warmer climate. Their analysis, which also revealed the physical mechanisms controlling this phenomenon, involved a unique approach that traced the progression of low-pressure weather systems both from the outside – in their movement around the globe – and from the inside – analyzing the storms’ dynamics.  

CRISPR-carrying nanoparticles edit the genome
November 15, 2017 11:11 AM - Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

In a new study, MIT researchers have developed nanoparticles that can deliver the CRISPR genome-editing system and specifically modify genes in mice. The team used nanoparticles to carry the CRISPR components, eliminating the need to use viruses for delivery.

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