Wildlife

Squid populations on the rise
May 24, 2016 07:09 AM - University of Adelaide

Unlike the declining populations of many fish species, the number of cephalopods (octopus, cuttlefish and squid) has increased in the world's oceans over the past 60 years, a University of Adelaide study has found.

The international team, led by researchers from the University's Environment Institute, compiled a global database of cephalopod catch rates to investigate long-term trends in abundance, published in Cell Press journal Current Biology.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Wildlife Topic

ADVERTISEMENT

Giant Iceberg Causes Penguin Deaths
February 18, 2016 10:41 PM - Laura Goldman, Care2

For the past six years, an iceberg the size of Rome has blocked the access of Adélie penguins to the sea in Antarctica. To find food, they must walk a detour of nearly 40 miles to the coast.

The impact on the colony has been devastating: More than 150,000 penguins have died.

The approximately 1,800-square-mile iceberg (referred to as B09B) struck a glacier and became stuck in Commonwealth Bay back in 2010, essentially land-locking 160,000 penguins. Before then, the colony was thriving, thanks to strong winds that blew ice from the shore, making it easy to hunt for fish.

“The Cape Denison population could be extirpated within 20 years unless B09B relocates or the now perennial fast ice within the bay breaks out,” wrote scientists from the Climate Change Research Centre at Australia’s University of New South Wales (UNSW) in a study published this month in Antarctic Science.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Wildlife Topic

SPOTLIGHT

The Great Green Wall of Africa

Llowell Williams, Care2

Though a border wall with Mexico is currently a matter of serious discussion in the United States, the aim of which is to prevent the physical movement of people (with few other apparent “benefits”), some walls can actually bring together and preserve communities, rather than divide them.

In only five years, the UN says, around 60 million Africans may be displaced as their land ceases to be arable, a potential humanitarian disaster the scale of which would be unprecedented. This would be devastating to a huge portion of the African continent not only ecologically and economically but socially as well.

That’s where Africa’s ingenious Great Green Wall comes in.

Experts at the United Nations say without action, desertification may claim two-thirds of Africa’s farmlands in under a decade. The Great Green Wall, however, was conceived as a wide-reaching strategy to halt Northern Africa’s rapidly advancing Sahara Desert.

The Great Green Wall, once complete, will stretch an incredible 4,400 miles from Senegal in West Africa to the East African nation of Djibouti. Instead of bricks and mortar, the wall will be made of trees and other vegetation, including plants that can be eaten or used to create medicine.

What's new on our Community Blog



Eco-friendly House Build

October 20th, 2015
Building a house requires a lot of thought, but why not incorporate an environmentally-friendly element into the process?
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Natural Disasters: Can We Help?

October 6th, 2015
Today's infographic outlines the worst natural disasters in human history, and identifies how we can best minimize the impact of these disasters.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Organisms Named after Famous People

September 28th, 2015
From a beetle with biceps like Arnold Schwarzenegger to a wasp named after the Dementors from the Harry Potter series, there are some truly bizarre organisms that have been named after celebrities...
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Member Press Releases

More Press Releases

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2016©. Copyright Environmental News Network