Wildlife

Where the Wild Things Aren't: Cats Avoid Places Coyotes Roam
July 1, 2015 07:33 AM - NC State University

Domestic cats might be determined hunters, but they stick mostly to residential areas instead of venturing into parks and protected areas where coyotes roam. That’s the key finding from a North Carolina State University analysis of more than 2,100 sites – the first large-scale study of free-ranging cats in the U.S. published in the Journal of Mammalogy.

Why is it important to know where 74 million pet cats spend their time away from home?

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Wildlife Topic

ADVERTISEMENT

No Sunscreen Needed
May 12, 2015 08:47 AM - ENN Editor

With summer sun right around the corner, it is important to be prepared and protect our skin from those potentially harmful rays. Whether you use sunscreen or set up an umbrella for shade at the beach, we should be proactive so we don't get sun-burn.

For us, we take precautions, but how do the rest of the animal kingdom fare? How can animal species spend their whole lives outdoors with no apparent concern about high levels of solar exposure?

According to researchers from Oregon State University, animals make their own sunscreen.

The findings, published in the journal eLife, found that many fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds can naturally produce a compound called gadusol, which among other biologic activities provides protection from the ultraviolet, or sun-burning component of sunlight.

The researchers also believe that this ability may have been obtained through some prehistoric, natural genetic engineering.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Wildlife Topic

SPOTLIGHT

Could genetically modified mosquitos prevent mosquito-borne illnesses?

Lisa Palmer, Yale Environment 360

When people think of genetically modified organisms, food crops like GM corn and soybeans usually come to mind. But engineering more complex living things is now possible, and the controversy surrounding genetic modification has now spread to the lowly mosquito, which is being genetically engineered to control mosquito-borne illnesses.

A U.K.-based company, Oxitec, has altered two genes in the Aedes aegypti mosquito so that when modified males breed with wild females, the offspring inherit a lethal gene and die in the larval stage. The state agency that controls mosquitos in the Florida Keys is awaiting approval from the federal government of a trial release of Oxitec’s genetically modified mosquitos to prevent a recurrence of a dengue fever outbreak. But some people in the Keys and elsewhere are up in arms, with more than 155,000 signing a petition opposing the trial of genetically engineered mosquitoes in a small area of 400 households next to Key West. 

What's new on our Community Blog



11 Nature-Inspired Home Design Ideas

June 29th, 2015
Overall consumer spending on eco-friendly products have increased in the United States as of 2014. Check out some products and ideas to help creatively design your home in beneficial, eco-friendly ways while preserving the beauty that nature has to offer.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

EPA study: Climate Change to Wipeout Eastern Trout, Salmon by 2100

June 23rd, 2015
According to an EPA study, in less than 90 years there will no longer be any trout or salmon east of the Mississippi River and populations in the west will only survive in the most mountainous areas. Current projections suggest climate change will render enormous swaths of habitat too warm to support these ecologically, and economically important cold-water fish.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

9 Green Air Freshener Ideas

June 17th, 2015
A fragrant home is a happy home. Rethink how you tackle the stink - commercial air fresheners are full of chemicals. Instead, go green and make your own natural air fresheners with a few of these easy alternatives!
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2015©. Copyright Environmental News Network