Wildlife

Greenland's summer ocean bloom likely fueled by iron
July 7, 2017 11:33 AM - Ker Than, Stanford School of Earth, Energy, & Environmental Services

Iron-rich meltwater from Greenland’s glaciers are helping fuel a summer bloom of phytoplankton.

Changes in conservation planning can benefit vulnerable mammals
July 6, 2017 12:37 PM - Colorado State University

Right now, a prairie dog in Colorado is busy increasing soil carbon retention, increasing water infiltration, and clipping vegetation that will help maintain local grasslands and provide nutritious forage for large herbivores like cattle and bison. And, somewhere in Mexico, a pollinating bat is ensuring agave plants make good tequila.

Changes in conservation planning can benefit vulnerable mammals
July 6, 2017 12:37 PM - Colorado State University

Right now, a prairie dog in Colorado is busy increasing soil carbon retention, increasing water infiltration, and clipping vegetation that will help maintain local grasslands and provide nutritious forage for large herbivores like cattle and bison. And, somewhere in Mexico, a pollinating bat is ensuring agave plants make good tequila.

'Weedy' fish species to take over our future oceans
July 6, 2017 12:34 PM - University of Adelaide

University of Adelaide researchers have for the first time demonstrated that the ocean acidification expected in the future will reduce fish diversity significantly, with small ‘weedy’ species dominating marine environments. 

Hot new imagery of wintering bats suggests a group behavior for battling white-nose syndrome
July 6, 2017 08:00 AM - USGS

Hot new imagery from temperature-sensing cameras suggests that bats who warm up from hibernation together throughout the winter may be better at surviving white nose syndrome, a disease caused by a cold-loving fungus ravaging insect-eating bat populations in the United States and Canada. The study by researchers with Massey University in New Zealand and the USGS was published in Methods in Ecology and Evolution.  

Hot new imagery of wintering bats suggests a group behavior for battling white-nose syndrome
July 6, 2017 08:00 AM - USGS

Hot new imagery from temperature-sensing cameras suggests that bats who warm up from hibernation together throughout the winter may be better at surviving white nose syndrome, a disease caused by a cold-loving fungus ravaging insect-eating bat populations in the United States and Canada. The study by researchers with Massey University in New Zealand and the USGS was published in Methods in Ecology and Evolution.  

Krill hotspot fuels incredible biodiversity in Antarctic region
July 6, 2017 07:19 AM - Oregon State University

There are so many Antarctic krill in the Southern Ocean that the combined mass of these tiny aquatic organisms is more than that of the world’s 7.5 billion human inhabitants.

Scientists have long known about this important zooplankton species, but they haven’t been certain why particular regions or “hotspots” in the Southern Ocean are so productive.

Decoding life under our waters to ensure species' survival
July 5, 2017 08:05 AM - University of New Brunswick

Four hundred million lines of text: that’s how much data is in a single gene-sequencing file when Scott Pavey’s team receives it. If you wanted to scan it manually, and generously assume it would take one second per line to look at, it would take you 12 and a half years of reading around the clock to get through it all.

Eyes on Nature: How Satellite Imagery Is Transforming Conservation Science
July 4, 2017 02:19 PM - Yale Environment 360

High-resolution earth imagery has provided ecologists and conservationists with a dynamic new tool that is enabling everything from more accurate counting of wildlife populations to rapid detection of deforestation, illegal mining, and other changes in the landscape.

Eyes on Nature: How Satellite Imagery Is Transforming Conservation Science
July 4, 2017 02:19 PM - Yale Environment 360

High-resolution earth imagery has provided ecologists and conservationists with a dynamic new tool that is enabling everything from more accurate counting of wildlife populations to rapid detection of deforestation, illegal mining, and other changes in the landscape.

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