Wildlife

Scottish badgers highlight the complexity of species responses to environmental change
May 8, 2017 12:54 PM - Uppsala Universitet

In a new study researchers have found that although warmer weather should benefit badger populations, the predicted human population increase in the Scottish highlands is likely to disturb badgers and counteract that effect. These results emphasise the importance of interactive effects and context-dependent responses when planning conservation management under human-induced rapid environmental change.

Scottish badgers highlight the complexity of species responses to environmental change
May 8, 2017 12:54 PM - Uppsala Universitet

In a new study researchers have found that although warmer weather should benefit badger populations, the predicted human population increase in the Scottish highlands is likely to disturb badgers and counteract that effect. These results emphasise the importance of interactive effects and context-dependent responses when planning conservation management under human-induced rapid environmental change.

Migrating mule deer track green waves of spring forage
May 8, 2017 08:35 AM - USGS

Migratory mule deer in Wyoming closely time their movements to track the spring green-up, providing evidence of an underappreciated foraging benefit of migration, according to a study by University of Wyoming and U.S. Geological Survey scientists at the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit.

Birds choose their neighbours based on personality
May 5, 2017 09:20 AM - University of Oxford

Birds of a feather nest together, according to a new study which has found that male great tits (Parus major) choose neighbours with similar personalities to their own.

Birds choose their neighbours based on personality
May 5, 2017 09:20 AM - University of Oxford

Birds of a feather nest together, according to a new study which has found that male great tits (Parus major) choose neighbours with similar personalities to their own.

Wind Turbines Affect Behavior of Desert Tortoise Predators
May 5, 2017 08:11 AM - USGS

How a wind energy facility is designed can influence the behavior of animal predators and their prey, according to a recent study published in The Journal of Wildlife Management by researchers at the University of California, Davis, and the U.S. Geological Survey.

Scientists placed motion-activated cameras facing the entrances of 46 active desert tortoise burrows in a wind energy facility near Palm Springs, California. Video recordings showed that visits to burrows from five predators -- bobcats, gray foxes, coyotes, black bears and western spotted skunks -- increased closer to dirt roads, and decreased closer to wind turbines.

Wildlife Recovery Following the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill was Highly Variable Across Species
May 3, 2017 08:19 AM - USGS

Thanks to a quarter-century of research and monitoring, scientists now know how different wildlife species were injured by the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill and how long it took for populations to recover.

This information may have important implications when responding to other oil spills, when conducting damage assessment studies after spills and when considering the environmental risks associated with extracting and shipping oil.

Avian Flu Testing of Wild Ducks Informs Biosecurity and Can Reduce Economic Loss
May 2, 2017 07:49 AM - USGS

Ducks in North America can be carriers of avian influenza viruses similar to those found in a 2016 outbreak in Indiana that led to the losses of hundreds of thousands of chickens and turkeys, according to a recent study.

Avian Flu Testing of Wild Ducks Informs Biosecurity and Can Reduce Economic Loss
May 2, 2017 07:49 AM - USGS

Ducks in North America can be carriers of avian influenza viruses similar to those found in a 2016 outbreak in Indiana that led to the losses of hundreds of thousands of chickens and turkeys, according to a recent study.

Billions More Milkweeds Needed to Restore Monarchs
April 28, 2017 08:15 AM - USGS

As many as 1.8 billion additional stems of milkweed plants may be needed in North America to return imperiled monarch butterflies to a sustainable population size, according to a recently published U.S. Geological Survey study.

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