Wildlife

Scientists Say Many More Right Whales May Be Dying than Previously Thought
July 25, 2005 12:00 AM - Jay Lindsay, Associated Press

More than eight in 10 right whale deaths may be going undiscovered, according to marine scientists who called for emergency action to help prevent humans from accidentally killing the rare animal.

Turf War Hits U.S. Aid for Tiger Conservation
July 25, 2005 12:00 AM - Subodh Ghildiyal, The Times of India

After generating heat across the country, tiger conservation has kicked off a turf war. The environment and forest ministry has given an outright thumbs down to a proposal for Indo-US cooperation for Bengal tiger conservation which would commit the US to funnel huge sums to the cause in return of a say in the project.

Hawaiian Caterpillar Has Unique Taste
July 22, 2005 12:00 AM - Randolph E. Schmid, Associated Press

A type of caterpillar with a taste for escargot rather than the normal vegetable diet has been discovered in Hawaii. The caterpillar is the first ever observed to eat any kind of mollusk, researchers report in Friday's issue of the journal Science.

Program Seeks Help Finding Dragonflies
July 22, 2005 12:00 AM - William Kates, Associated Press

The New York Dragonfly and Damselfly Atlas will map dragonfly and damselfly distribution across the state, highlight regions with exceptional diversity, and further the conservation of imperiled species, said Henry Tepper, state director for The Nature Conservancy, which sponsors the nature heritage program along with the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

Scientists Plan to Reintroduce Gray Whales off UK
July 22, 2005 12:00 AM - Reuters

Squadrons of Gray whales could be winging their way across the Atlantic within a decade to restock British waters under plans put forward by two conservation scientists. Andrew Ramsey and Owen Nevin of the University of Lancaster's School of Natural Resources in northern England floated the idea at a meeting in Brazil earlier this week.

Expert Questions Existence of Woodpecker
July 22, 2005 12:00 AM - Caryn Rousseau, Associated Press

An expert on the ivory-billed woodpecker is questioning evidence that purportedly shows the rare bird, once thought to be extinct, in the swamps of southeast Arkansas. Jerome A. Jackson, a zoologist at Florida Gulf Coast University, is challenging a blurry video cited by other scientists as showing a clip of one bird, saying the four-second image does "no more than suggest the possibility" that the bird still exists.

Microchip Saves Rare Cambodian Turtle
July 21, 2005 12:00 AM - Margie Mason, Associated Press

They're calling him "the lucky royal turtle" -- a rare and endangered reptile that was saved from a likely fate in a Chinese soup pot by keen-eyed wildlife officers and a microchip.

Population of Endangered Woodpecker Rises
July 20, 2005 12:00 AM - Elliott Minor, Associated Press

Working by flashlight in a Georgia pine forest, wildlife biologists carefully position nets over tree cavities 30 to 40 feet above ground. Soon there's a rustling in the darkness, and they manage to catch one red-cockaded woodpecker. Biologist Jim Cox then attaches aluminum leg bands that will help track the bird's movements.

Scientists Speed Coral Growth
July 20, 2005 12:00 AM - Sam Kean, St. Louis Post Dispatch

St. Louis sits hundreds of miles from the nearest natural coral, and it's on the other side of the world from the most famous coral reef. Yet the key to saving this crucial oceanic organism just might have sprung from the muddy banks of the Mississippi.

Officials Claim Japan Used Aid Promises to Win Support for Commercial Whaling
July 19, 2005 12:00 AM - Rod McGuirk, Associated Press

Japan used promises of aid to buy support from impoverished nations for its bid to overturn an international ban on commercial whaling, former officials from three such countries have said.

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