Wildlife

Popular Walrus Cam To Go Offline for Hunt
September 9, 2005 12:00 AM - Jeannette J. Lee, Associated Press

Popular Web cameras that allow viewers to watch live video of Pacific walruses will be shut off this week at the request of Alaska Natives. Leaders do not want viewers to see the animals shot and butchered during a fall subsistence hunt, fearing widespread Internet images could threaten the tradition.

Taiwan God Pig Sacrifice: Religious Rite or Cruelty?
September 9, 2005 12:00 AM - Tiffany Wu, Reuters

Every year, about 700 pigs are force-fed to gargantuan proportions to participate in competitions which are held by Taiwanese ethnic groups for traditional festivals that incorporate elements of Buddhism, Taoism and Chinese folk religion. Traditional custom is to kill the pigs while they are conscious, even though animal rights advocates say Taiwan law requires pre-slaughter stunning of livestock to ease suffering.

Environmentalists Sue to Save Woodpecker
September 9, 2005 12:00 AM - Annie Bergman, Associated Press

Environmentalists who fear a plan to divert water to eastern Arkansas farms will harm the habitat of the recently rediscovered ivory-billed woodpecker filed a federal lawsuit Thursday.

Tainted Loons, U.S. Senators Tackle EPA on Mercury
September 9, 2005 12:00 AM - Ellen Wulfhorst, Reuters

The scruffy loon chick let out an unpracticed version of the water bird's famed call as researchers tested it for mercury from its native northern New England, home to one of America's highest known concentrations of the dangerous toxin.

Doctor: Animal Survivors of Katrina Dying of Thirst and Starvation
September 9, 2005 12:00 AM - ENN

Stephen W. Stigers, M.D., D.M.D., an anesthesiologist at Doctors Park Surgery in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, returned September 5 after a weekend spent helping the massive aid effort in New Orleans.

Gulf Coast Fishermen Hope Katrina Spared Sea Life
September 8, 2005 12:00 AM - Crispian Balmer, Reuters

Fisherman Greg Verges believes the shrimp knew a bad storm was coming their way even before the locals did. The week before Hurricane Katrina's catastrophic arrival, Verges' boat landed 400 pounds of prime quality shrimp in the Biloxi channel. Then, day after day, the catches fell off. "On the day before Katrina, I brought home just 40 shrimps."

Chilis Cool Conflict Between Man and Elephants
September 8, 2005 12:00 AM - Ed Stoddard, Reuters

It has spiced up many a meal but now the fiery chili pepper is being used to cool an ancient feud between farmers and wild elephants in Africa. In the Zambezi valley in southern Zambia, small-scale farmers are growing chili peppers as a deterrent against elephants that raid their crops -- and marketing the end result as an eco-friendly product.

Estimates Put Wolf Numbers Up in Rockies
September 7, 2005 12:00 AM - Becky Bohrer, Associated Press

The number of gray wolves in the Northern Rockies has increased to more than 900 since last year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimated Tuesday. According to the agency's mid-year estimate, 912 wolves now roam the three-state region, compared to 835 in December, said Ed Bangs, Fish and Wildlife's wolf recovery coordinator in Helena, Mont.

Indonesian Orangutans Under Siege, Green Groups Say
September 7, 2005 12:00 AM - Reuters

Hundreds of orangutans are killed or captured every year on the Indonesian part of Borneo island as part of an illegal trade that is driving the primates towards extinction, green groups said on Tuesday.

India Offers Reward To Track Down Tiger Poachers
September 6, 2005 12:00 AM - Krittivas Mukherjee, Reuters

India is offering money to poor forest villagers to help catch poachers in a bid to save its endangered tiger population. Poachers and smugglers are known to pay villagers to use their skill in tracking and killing tigers and elephants.

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