Wildlife

Do Birdsong and Human Speech Share Biological Roots?
November 22, 2017 01:56 PM - McGill University

Do songbirds and humans have common biological hardwiring that shapes how they produce and perceive sounds?

Do Birdsong and Human Speech Share Biological Roots?
November 22, 2017 01:56 PM - McGill University

Do songbirds and humans have common biological hardwiring that shapes how they produce and perceive sounds?

Scientific team selected to conduct independent abundance estimate of red snapper in Gulf of Mexico
November 22, 2017 08:09 AM - NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

A team of university and government scientists, selected by an expert review panel convened by the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, will conduct an independent study to estimate the number of red snapper in the U.S. waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

“American communities across the Gulf of Mexico depend on their access to, as well as the long term sustainability of, red snapper,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “I look forward to the insights this project will provide as we study and manage this valuable resource.”

Turtles & Technology Advance Understanding of Lung Abnormality
November 21, 2017 01:26 PM - Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. Digital 3D anatomical models created by Emma Schachner, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, made the detailed research possible. The work is published in the December 2017 issue of The Journal of Anatomy, the cover of which features an image of the study’s 3D models.

Turtles & Technology Advance Understanding of Lung Abnormality
November 21, 2017 01:26 PM - Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. Digital 3D anatomical models created by Emma Schachner, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, made the detailed research possible. The work is published in the December 2017 issue of The Journal of Anatomy, the cover of which features an image of the study’s 3D models.

Researcher seeks to protect where the wild things walk
November 21, 2017 08:06 AM - University of British Columbia

UBC research is paving the way for a route that will serve as a pilot project to protect green space and allow wildlife to move throughout the Okanagan Valley.

Kelowna was identified in the 2016 Stats Canada census as one of the fastest-growing cities in Canada. With growth comes development and UBC Professor Lael Parrott says the region is in danger of fragmenting low-elevation ecosystems and losing the habitat and movement routes needed by wildlife, especially on the east side of Okanagan Lake.

Thinking Big by Burning Small
November 20, 2017 12:52 PM - University of the Witwatersrand

A recent paper by scientists from Wits University in South Africa shows how creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in national parks.

Study looks at why ring-tailed lemurs raise a stink when they flirt with potential mates
November 20, 2017 08:15 AM - University of Toronto

A University of Toronto study finds that a unique ritual performed by male ring-tailed lemurs may come at a significant physical cost, but it likely helps their chances in securing a mate.

Ring-tailed lemurs are Strepsirrhines, a sub-order of primates who share a common ancestor with humans. They are very social animals, living in large groups with females dominating the group. Like other lemurs, they huddle in large groups in order to keep warm and maintain social bonds, with lower ranking males often excluded.

Species in the North are More Vulnerable to Climate Change
November 16, 2017 11:45 AM - Lund University

Acclimation means the ability of both animals and plants to adjust their physiology when it gets hotter or colder. In this way, individual organs are able to interact effectively and various processes in the body function optimally in varying conditions.

Species in the North are More Vulnerable to Climate Change
November 16, 2017 11:45 AM - Lund University

Acclimation means the ability of both animals and plants to adjust their physiology when it gets hotter or colder. In this way, individual organs are able to interact effectively and various processes in the body function optimally in varying conditions.

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