Wildlife

Study Reveals Most Wild Chimps Are Southpaws
August 16, 2005 12:00 AM - Randolph E. Schmid, Associated Press

When it comes to fishing tasty termites out of their mounds, wild chimpanzees don't have the right stuff. Most, in fact, are southpaws. A three-year study of 17 wild chimps in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, found that 12 of them used their left hands when using sticks to probe for termites.

U.S. Marines Use Donkeys To Go Places Their Humvees and Other Modern Vehicles Cannot
August 15, 2005 12:00 AM - Daniel Cooney, Associated Press

Frustrated with the limitations of using its fleet of modern Humvee four-wheel-drives in rugged mountains with few roads, a battalion of U.S. Marines has enlisted a mode of transport used for centuries by Afghan villagers -- donkeys.

Oil Leases Endanger Wildlife, Coalition Says
August 15, 2005 12:00 AM - Wesley Loy, Anchorage Daily News

An 11-state organization that helps manage migratory birds is urging federal land managers to back off a plan to expand oil and gas leasing on the tundra north of Teshekpuk Lake in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska.

Treadmill Arrives for Alaska's Elephant
August 14, 2005 12:00 AM - Mary Pemberton, Associated Press

A 16,000-pound treadmill specifically built to exercise Maggie the elephant arrived at the Alaska Zoo, but the question remains: Just how do you get a more than 4-ton animal fighting the battle of the bulge to use a treadmill?

Wildlife Moves to Stay Cool in a Warmer World
August 12, 2005 12:00 AM - Alister Doyle, Reuters

Salmon swim north into Arctic seas, locusts plague northern Italy and two heat-loving bee-eater birds nest in a hedge in Britain. Signs of global warming fed by greenhouse gases produced by human activity, or just summertime oddities?

South African Farmers Trade Livestock for Wildlife
August 12, 2005 12:00 AM - Alexandra Zavis, Associated Press

Squinting into his binoculars, William Fowlds scans a vast, grassy plane where a busy dairy once stood. The cattle and sheep have given way to herds of grazing antelope. Out of a knot of thorny bushes, a family of elephants emerges.

Caterpillars Becoming a Nuisance in Vermont
August 10, 2005 12:00 AM - Associated Press

Forest tent caterpillars have munched through thousands of acres of trees this year, but state officials don't expect the state's sugar maples to suffer any long term damage.

Roundup Is Killing Off Amphibians, Ecologist Says
August 10, 2005 12:00 AM - Eric Hand, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Worldwide, amphibians are dying. And University of Pittsburgh ecologist Rick Relyea said he knows one way to kill them: Spray them with a little Roundup, the best-selling weed killer from St. Louis-based Monsanto.

Poachers Massacre Protected Turtles on Mexico Beach
August 10, 2005 12:00 AM - Alistair Bell, Reuters

Mexican poachers bludgeoned and chopped some 80 protected Olive Ridley sea turtles to death for their eggs, believed to be an aphrodisiac, and left their shells scattered on a Pacific beach.

Alaska Sea Otters to Get U.S. Protection
August 9, 2005 12:00 AM - Mary Pemberton, Associated Press

Southwest Alaska's sea otters, which came back from the brink of extinction in the 1800s, are facing another dramatic decline and could be named a "threatened" species as early as Tuesday.

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