Wildlife

Animal Rights Groups Back U.S. Bill to Make Antifreeze Bitter
July 19, 2005 12:00 AM - Reuters

A pack of dogs joined forces with industry and consumer groups Monday to urge Congress to pass legislation requiring antifreeze manufacturers to make their otherwise sweet tasting product less appealing to animals and children.

Rare White Alligator in Legal Limbo
July 19, 2005 12:00 AM - Associated Press

A rare white alligator is being housed at Riverbanks Zoo, but the reptile is seen only by its keepers because it's evidence in a legal case against the brothers who captured it. Ted Clamp, 59, and his brother Heyward, 62, argue that they took the gator in to protect it, but they are charged with taking and possessing an American alligator, a crime under a state law designed to protect an endangered species.

Protecting California Salamander to Cost $367 Million
July 18, 2005 12:00 AM - Associated Press

Protecting the California tiger salamander as a threatened species will cost the state $367 million in lost development opportunities over the next two decades, federal wildlife officials said Friday.

Texas A&M Leads World in Cloning Animals
July 18, 2005 12:00 AM - Juan A. Lozano, Associated Press

Eighty-six Squared has never been in a hurry. The Black Angus bull was born 15 years after cells from his genetic donor, Bull 86, were frozen as part of a study on natural disease resistance. When Bull 86 died in 1997, scientists thought his unique genetic makeup was lost. But researchers at Texas A&M University were able to clone him from the frozen cells in 2000.

National Zoo Cub Shows Panda Markings
July 18, 2005 12:00 AM - Derrill Holly, Associated Press

Just a week old, Mei Xiang's tiny cub is beginning to sport the dark markings characteristic of the endangered giant panda. The darkening tone of skin around the eyes of the cub, the first to be born at the zoo in 16 years, will eventually be replaced with fur.

Thousands Count Endangered Bird in India
July 18, 2005 12:00 AM - Ramola Talwar Bedam, Associated Press

Carrying binoculars and notebooks, thousands of nature lovers and conservationists scoured semiarid grasslands of western India Sunday to count a bird considered on the brink of extinction.

Sockeye Yield May Signal Recovery
July 18, 2005 12:00 AM - Wesley Loy, Anchorage Daily News

Fishermen in Bristol Bay are catching scads of sockeye, notching the second consecutive strong season for the state's most important commercial salmon fishery.

Hawaii Fights Spread of Small, Noisy Frogs
July 15, 2005 12:00 AM - Audrey McAvoy, Associated Press

It's hard to imagine a tiny, 2-inch frog could cause so much harm. Beloved in its native Puerto Rico, the coqui frog has become a menace in Hawaii, where it suddenly appeared in the 1990s.

Chemical Contamination in Arctic Linked to Bird Droppings
July 15, 2005 12:00 AM - Randolph E. Schmid, Associated Press

A major source of chemical contamination in the Arctic turns out to be bird droppings. A study by a group of Canadian researchers found that the chemical pollution in areas frequented by seabirds can be many times higher than in nearby regions.

California Officials Worry About Asian Beetle
July 14, 2005 12:00 AM - Kathleen Hennessey, Associated Press

State and federal agriculture officials on Wednesday warned that destructive Asian beetles have been found near a Sacramento warehouse and dispatched federal firefighters to climb nearby trees to search for traces of the insects.

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