Wildlife

Climate change could put rare bat species at greater risk
August 2, 2017 01:20 PM - University of Southampton

An endangered bat species with a UK population of less than 1,000 could be further threatened by the effects of global warming, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Adorable alpine animal acclimates behavior to a changing climate
August 1, 2017 09:50 AM - Ecological Society of America

As climate change brings new pressures to bear on wildlife, species must “move, adapt, acclimate, or die.” Erik Beever and colleagues review the literature on acclimation through behavioral flexibility, identifying patterns in examples from invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, and fishes, in the cover article for the August issue of the Ecological Society of America’s (ESA) journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. The authors focus on the American pika (Ochotona princeps) as a case study in behavioral adaptation.

Adorable alpine animal acclimates behavior to a changing climate
August 1, 2017 09:50 AM - Ecological Society of America

As climate change brings new pressures to bear on wildlife, species must “move, adapt, acclimate, or die.” Erik Beever and colleagues review the literature on acclimation through behavioral flexibility, identifying patterns in examples from invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, and fishes, in the cover article for the August issue of the Ecological Society of America’s (ESA) journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. The authors focus on the American pika (Ochotona princeps) as a case study in behavioral adaptation.

Fear May Play a Role in Animal Extinction, Study Reveals
August 1, 2017 08:10 AM - University of Guelph

Fear alone may be enough to cause vulnerable species to go extinct, according to a new University of Guelph study.

Prof. Ryan Norris has discovered that the mere smell of a predator affects the reproductive success of fruit flies.

Grown-up gannets find favourite fishing grounds
August 1, 2017 08:10 AM - University of Exeter

Like humans, some birds can spend years learning and exploring before developing more settled habits.

A study of northern gannets has shown adults return to the same patch of sea over and over again to find food.

Aardvarks' tragic fate points to worrying consequences for wildlife as a result of climate change
July 31, 2017 09:46 AM - University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

The aardvark, a highlight for anyone on a game-viewing African safari, will become increasingly rare as the world warms and dries, and the consequences go well beyond a decline in aardvark safari encounters.

Aardvarks' tragic fate points to worrying consequences for wildlife as a result of climate change
July 31, 2017 09:46 AM - University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

The aardvark, a highlight for anyone on a game-viewing African safari, will become increasingly rare as the world warms and dries, and the consequences go well beyond a decline in aardvark safari encounters.

How A Surge in Visitors Is Overwhelming America's National Parks
July 31, 2017 09:02 AM - Yale Environment 360

Zion National Park in southwestern Utah is the poster child for the crowding of America’s most hallowed natural places. With its soaring and magisterial red, dun, and white rock cliffs with grand names such as the Court of the Patriarchs and the Temple of Sinawava, Zion is at the top of the list of the nation’s most dramatic scenery.

How A Surge in Visitors Is Overwhelming America's National Parks
July 31, 2017 09:02 AM - Yale Environment 360

Zion National Park in southwestern Utah is the poster child for the crowding of America’s most hallowed natural places. With its soaring and magisterial red, dun, and white rock cliffs with grand names such as the Court of the Patriarchs and the Temple of Sinawava, Zion is at the top of the list of the nation’s most dramatic scenery.

Small, deep-water Alaska sponge has molecules that selectively target and kill pancreatic tumor cells
July 31, 2017 08:02 AM - NOAA

Compared to its dazzling deep-sea coral neighbors, the green Latrunculia austini sponge is pretty drab. Dotted with craters and pitted by deep holes the golf-ball sized sponge is curious-looking rather than beautiful. But green Latrunculia’s unique chemical composition holds a promise much greater than mere beauty.

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