From: Andrew Burger, Global Warming is Real, More from this Affiliate
Published June 19, 2013 09:26 AM

Hawaii's Fishermen: Scapegoats for Forces Outside their Control

Climate change is affecting fisheries in the Western Pacific and around the world, but a host of other factors, including land use, are threatening fisheries and the health and integrity of marine ecosystems. Aiming for sustainable fisheries, marine policymakers, resource managers, fishermen and other stakeholders are increasingly looking to take a more holistic, integrated approach to fisheries management, as evidenced during the latest meeting of the Western Regional Fishery Management Council (WRFMC) meeting, which was held in Oahu.

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Often blamed for overexploiting fish stocks, local fishermen in Hawaii are keenly aware of external impacts on the health and integrity of marine ecosystems and fish populations. At the latest WRFMC meeting in Honolulu, they argued in support of taking a more comprehensive ecosystems management approach, specifically zooming in on how land use and associated runoff from cities, agriculture and industry are harming marine ecosystems and fisheries.

"Hawaii fishermen asked policymakers to address how runoff caused by land development harms reefs, fisheries and oceans when they consider how to cope with the effects of climate change," the AP's Audrey Mcavoy wrote in news report.

Established by Congress in 1976 per the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation Act (MSA), the WRFMC is one of eight Fishery Management Councils in the US. Its regulatory authority stretches from the Pacific Ocean waters off Hawaii to include those off Guam, American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands. MSA was amended in 1996 "to prevent overfishing, minimize by-catch and protect the fish stocks and habitat."

Adopting a bottom-up approach to fisheries and marine resource management, the Council is made up of 16 Council members, which draw on input from local and community fishermen and the broader public, as well as marine scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center and the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Pelagic Fisheries Research Program.

Local fishermen have wound up being "scapegoats" for declining fish stocks and catches, one fishermen told committee members, arguing "that what happens on land is one cause of deteriorating reefs." But he says fishermen can't control what happens 'up mauka,' or "toward the mountains," Mcavoy reported from the Regional Ecosystem Advisory Committee for Hawaii fisheries meeting.

Said local fishermen Carl Jellings, "We fight every day so we can continue fishing. It's getting harder and harder because more things are happening in the environment that we're getting blamed for."

Scientists at the meeting highlighted the rise in global mean temperatures and a drop in local rainfall, pointing out how different fish species differ in their ability to adapt to climate change.

Continue reading at Global Warming is Real.

Fishing boat image via Shutterstock.

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