From: Kathryn Pintus, ARKive.org , More from this Affiliate
Published October 18, 2013 10:31 AM

Four in five children are not 'connected to nature'

The ground-breaking study, led by the RSPB, marks the first time that connectivity between children and nature has been studied in the UK. Following 3 years of research, the project concluded that only 21% of children between the ages of 8 and 12 were 'connected to nature' at a level which is considered to be both realistic and achievable for all young people.

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The report stems from growing concerns over the distinct lack of contact with and experience of nature among modern children, which some have argued is having a negative impact on their education, health and behaviour. In addition, this disconnection is viewed as being a very real threat to the future of UK wildlife.

Connecting to nature

Around 1,200 children from across the UK took part in the study, which was based on a specially developed questionnaire. Analysis of the results revealed several statistically significant differences in children's connection to nature across the UK, including between boys and girls, and between urban and rural homes.

"This report is ground-breaking," said Rebekah Stackhouse, Education and Youth Programmes Manager for RSPB Scotland. "It's widely accepted that today's children have less contact with nature than ever before. But until now, there has been no robust scientific attempt to measure and track connection to nature among children across the whole of the UK, which means the problem hasn’t been given the attention it deserves."

Scotland come out top in the regional comparisons, with 27% of children in the country being found to have a particular level of connection to the natural world, while children in Wales had the lowest score across the UK, with just 13% achieving the basic level of exposure to nature.

Perhaps surprisingly, the study revealed that the average score was higher for London than the rest of England and that, overall, urban children were slightly more connected to nature than those living in rural areas.

Gender differences

Interestingly, this latest research found that girls were more likely than boys to be exposed to nature and wildlife. While only 16% of boys were at or above the 'realistic and achievable' target, 27% of girls were found to be at the same level.

"We need to understand these differences," said Sue Armstrong-Brown, Head of Conservation Policy at the RSPB. "Whether boys and girls are scoring differently on different questions, are girls more empathetic to nature than boys, for instance? We need to analyse the data to find that out."

Continue reading at ENN affiliate, ARKive.org.

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