Top Stories

Discovery of switchblade-like defensive system redraws family tree of stonefishes

In dark alleys of the Pacific and Indian oceans, new research shows some of the deadliest, armored fishes on the planet are packing switchblades in their faces.

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Young salmon may leap to 'oust the louse'

“Everyone who has gone fishing has wondered why fish jump,” says John Reynolds, SFU professor of marine ecology.

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Dive into the mysterious connection between malaria and coral reefs

For most of us, microbes mean only one thing: disease. Disease-causing microbes are actually the extreme minority of the most abundant form of life on Earth.

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Cigarettes account for half of waste recovered on Vancouver and Victoria shorelines

Plastic waste—particularly from smoking– still dominates litter collected from B.C. coastlines, a recent study from the University of British Columbia has found.

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Behavioral Study of Greater Yellowstone Pronghorn Finds Highway Crossing Structures a Conservation Success

A recently published study by scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Oregon State University has confirmed that efforts to protect migrating pronghorn by installing wildlife crossing structures over highways have succeeded, in terms of the increased success rate of pronghorn crossings over time.

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Heatwave Made 'Twice as Likely by Climate Change'

In the newly published report, researchers from the Environmental Change Institute (ECI) at the School of Geography and Environment, Oxford University, who worked in collaboration with the World Weather Attribution network (WWA), reveal that climate change more than doubled the likelihood of the European heatwave, which could come to be known as regular summer temperatures.

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Play-Doh Helps Plant Research

When plants are in distress or being fed on by insects, they have been known to send out sensory volatile cues that alert organisms in the area — such as birds — that they are in need of help. While research has shown that this occurs in ecosystems such as forests, until now, this phenomenon has never been demonstrated in an agricultural setting.

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Your Tweets Can Help Map the Spread of Wildfire Smoke

At the end of July, Twitter user Alicia Santana posted a photo of a man sitting in a plastic folding chair in his yard. He’s looking away from the camera, towards a monstrous, orange cloud of smoke filling the sky beyond a wire fence. “My dad not wanting to leave his home,” Santana wrote, ending it with #MendocinoComplexFire.

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How Ugly Marital Spats Might Open the Door to Disease

Married people who fight nastily are more likely to suffer from leaky guts – a problem that unleashes bacteria into the blood and can drive up disease-causing inflammation, new research suggests.

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Common WiFi Can Detect Weapons, Bombs and Chemicals in Bags

Ordinary WiFi can easily detect weapons, bombs and explosive chemicals in bags at museums, stadiums, theme parks, schools and other public venues, according to a Rutgers University–New Brunswick-led study.

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