Top Stories

The origin of life at the bottom of the ocean

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? This question has puzzled scientists and curious citizens alike for many years.

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Arctic Sea Ice Decline Driving Ocean Phytoplankton Farther North

Phytoplankton blooms that form the base of the marine food web are expanding northward into ice-free waters where they have never been seen before, according to new research.

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Study reveals best use of wildflowers to benefit crops on farms

With bee pollinators in decline and pesky crop pests lowering yields, sustainable and organic farmers need environmentally friendly solutions.

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Air pollution linked to “huge” reduction in intelligence

Air pollution can have a “huge” negative effect on cognitive intelligence – especially amongst older men – according to a study released this past August.

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People Donate More When They Sense They Are Being Watched

The mere presence of a pair of eyes on a sign requesting donations makes people more likely to give more. This is according to a field study in Springer’s journal Human Nature. Lead author Caroline Kelsey of the University of Virginia in the US says the findings support the idea that people tend to act according to pro-social norms when they sense that they are being watched. It also suggests that eyes play a special role in promoting cooperation in humans. 

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Lift Off for World-First Ultrasound Levitation That Bends Around Barriers

Researchers at the University of Sussex have become the first in the world to develop technology which can bend sound waves around an obstacle and levitate an object above it.

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Discovery of Inner Ear Function May Improve Diagnosis of Hearing Impairment

Results from a research study published in Nature Communications show how the inner ear processes speech, something that has until now been unknown. The authors of the report include researchers from Linköping University.

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Stanford Scientists Observe Water Storage, a Missing Piece That Could Help Explain How Glaciers Move

Stanford scientists have revealed the presence of water stored within a glacier in Greenland, where the rapidly changing ice sheet is a major contributor to the sea-level rise North America will experience in the next 100 years. This observation – which came out of a new way of looking at existing data – has been a missing component for models aiming to predict how melting glaciers will impact the planet.

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Getting a Longer Heads-Up on El Niño

Changes in Atlantic Ocean sea surface temperatures can be used to predict extreme climatic variations known as El Niño and La Niña more than a year in advance, according to research conducted at Korea’s Pohang University of Science and Technology and published in the journal Scientific Reports.

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Economic Analysis Provides Watershed Moment for Environmental Groups

Economists have found that in the United States, watershed groups have had a positive impact on their local water quality. 

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