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More of the Chinese Population Will Be Exposed to Heat Waves or Less Comfortable Weather Conditions

One of the major concerns in climate change studies is how the thermal conditions for the living environment of human beings will change in the future. In a paper recently published in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters, Prof. GAO Xuejie from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and his coauthors, try to answer this question based on their recently completed and unprecedented set of high-resolution (25 km) 21st century climate change simulations. These simulations were produced using the regional climate model RegCM4, driven by four global model simulations over China—the country with the world’s largest population.

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The True Power of the Solar Wind

The planets and moons of our solar system are continuously being bombarded by particles hurled away from the sun. On Earth this has hardly any effect, apart from the fascinating northern lights, because the dense atmosphere and the magnetic field of the Earth protect us from these solar wind particles. But on the Moon or on Mercury things are different: There, the uppermost layer of rock is gradually eroded by the impact of sun particles. 

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Reliable energy for all

During high school, Prosper Nyovanie had to alter his daily and nightly schedules to accommodate the frequent power outages that swept cities across Zimbabwe.

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Beyond GPS: Researchers study monkeys that can plan their routes

They might not have mastered GPS technology, but vervet monkeys can find relatively short routes, much the same way that humans do.

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USGS Hurricane Response Met Challenges in 2017, Prepares for 2018

No one has a crystal ball to foresee what will happen during the 2018 hurricane season that begins June 1, but NOAA forecasters say there’s a 75 percent chance this hurricane season will be at least as busy as a normal year, or busier.

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The First Comprehensive, Long-term Look at Alaska’s Changing Ecosystems

New research has revealed significant changes to Alaska’s landscape in recent decades.

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Satellite Shows This Bud's a Major Hurricane for You, Eastern Pacific Ocean

The second major hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season formed after the first hurricane, Aletta, weakened. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of Hurricane Bud on June 11.

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Research Shows if Your Eyes Wrinkle When You Smile or Frown, You Appear More Sincere

Researchers at Western University have shown that our brains are pre-wired to perceive wrinkles around the eyes as conveying more intense and more sincere emotions. This eye-wrinkle feature, called the Duchenne marker, occurs across multiple facial expressions, including smiles, expressions associated with pain, and­—as found by these researchers—expressions of sadness.

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Diamond Dust Shimmering around Distant Stars

For decades, astronomers have puzzled over the exact source of a peculiar type of faint microwave light emanating from a number of regions across the Milky Way. Known as anomalous microwave emission (AME), this light comes from energy released by rapidly spinning nanoparticles – bits of matter so small that they defy detection by ordinary microscopes. (The period on an average printed page is approximately 500,000 nanometers across.)

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Further Drivers of Ocean Deoxygenation Identified

Measurements as well as model calculations equally show that the oxygen inventory of the oceans is decreasing. However, the models underestimate this decrease significantly making projections into the future problematic. In a study published today in the international journal Nature Geoscience, four GEOMAR researchers reveal the gaps in the models and identify further, previously underestimated drivers for the deoxygenation.

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