Top Stories

New International Project Explores Future Climates of Polar Regions

The Polar regions play a crucial role in balancing global climate – with the poles heating up much faster than the rest of the world.

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Social Distancing: Not Just for Humans

Coughs and colds spread quickly within wild mountain gorilla groups but appear less likely to spread between neighboring groups, a new study published in Scientific Reports shows.

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Birds Learn to Avoid Plants That Host Dangerous Insects, Researchers Have Found

Young birds that eat insects with conspicuous warning colouration to advertise their toxicity to would-be predators quickly learn to avoid other prey that carry the same markings.

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Drinking Our Way to Sustainability, One Cup of Coffee at a Time

Coffee, that savior of the underslept, comes with enormous environmental and social costs, from the loss of forest habitats as woodlands are converted to crops, to the economic precarity of small-scale farmers whose livelihoods depend on the whims of international markets. 

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A Multi-Dimensional Fire Challenge

Accumulating fuels and rising populations are contributing to California’s large, destructive fires.

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NASA Smoke Signals for Air Quality

The U.S. Forest Service now has a powerful way to view near-real time fire detection from NASA satellite data that they can include in their hourly air quality forecasts.

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Texas Pumpkin Growers Near End To Challenging Season

Despite some weather-related difficulties, this year saw average pumpkin yields and quality, experts say.

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Study Reveals Impact of Wild Meat Consumption on Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Consuming sustainably sourced wild meat instead of domesticated livestock reduces greenhouse gas emissions and retains precious tropical forest systems, which in turn mitigates the effects of climate change.

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Ozone Pollution: An Insidious and Growing Threat to Biodiversity

Sequoia National Park’s famous groves of stout, 300-foot-tall trees sit high on the western side of the Sierra Nevada, above California’s San Joaquin Valley.

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Early Human Activities Impacted Earth’s Atmosphere More Than Previously Known

Several years ago, while analyzing ice core samples from Antarctica’s James Ross Island, scientists Joe McConnell, Ph.D., and Nathan Chellman, Ph.D., from DRI, and Robert Mulvaney, Ph.D., from the British Antarctic Survey noticed something unusual: a substantial increase in levels of black carbon that began around the year 1300 and continued to the modern day.

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