Top Stories

Deep Antarctic Drilling Will Reveal Climate Secrets Trapped in 1.5 Million-Year-Old Ice

Scientists will have to drill at a depth of nearly 3km to retrieve some of the oldest ice that can tell us about the past and future of climate.

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New England’s Forest Primeval

Written accounts of Native Americans cultivating the land in New England overstate the importance of agriculture in the pre-contact period, according to a new study.

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Human-Sparked Fires Smaller, Less Intense, but More Frequent with Longer Seasons

Increasing ignitions by people contribute to ‘new normal’ for U.S. wildfire characteristics.

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A Decline in Asian Dust

Changing winds and more vegetation are probably contributing to the trend.

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Addressing Global Warming With New Nanoparticles and Sunshine

Harvesting sunlight, researchers of the Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) published in Materials Today a new strategy to transform carbon dioxide (CO2) into oxygen (O2) and pure carbon monoxide (CO) without side-products in water. 

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Belly Fat Linked With Repeat Heart Attacks

Heart attack survivors who carry excess fat around their waist are at increased risk of another heart attack, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

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Preparing Land for Palm Oil Causes Most Climate Damage

New research has found preparing land for palm oil plantations and the growth of young plants causes significantly more damage to the environment, emitting double the amount of greenhouse gases than mature plantations.

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How Melting Permafrost Is Beginning to Transform the Arctic

Canadian scientist Philip Marsh and I were flying along the coast of the Beaufort Sea, where the frozen tundra had recently opened up into a crater the size of a football stadium. 

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Global Study Finds Predators Are Most Likely to Be Lost When Habitats Are Converted for Human Use

A first of its kind, global study on the impacts of human land-use on different groups of animals has found that predators, especially small invertebrates like spiders and ladybirds, are the most likely to be lost when natural habitats are converted to agricultural land or towns and cities. 

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