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NOAA scientists get rare chance to study the effects of an eclipse on weather

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It’s the most fundamental principle of meteorology - energy from the sun drives Earth’s weather.

So what happens when the sun’s rays are blocked by an eclipse? And can modern forecasting tools accurately predict changes in the weather when the sun’s rays are partially or totally blocked?

It’s the most fundamental principle of meteorology - energy from the sun drives Earth’s weather.

So what happens when the sun’s rays are blocked by an eclipse? And can modern forecasting tools accurately predict changes in the weather when the sun’s rays are partially or totally blocked?

On August 21, NOAA scientists are going to find out.

With the help of an algorithm developed by a team from the University of Barcelona and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, researchers at NOAA Research’s Global Systems Division will use an experimental version of the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRRx) short-term weather model to attempt to predict subtle changes in the weather caused by the moon blotting out the sun - changes that current forecasting models are not equipped to handle.

 

Continue reading at NOAA.

Photo via NOAA.