• Rising sea salinates India's Ganges: expert

    KOLKATA, India (Reuters) - Rising sea levels are causing salt water to flow into India's biggest river, threatening its ecosystem and turning vast farmlands barren in the country's east, a climate change expert warned Monday. A study by an east Indian university in the city of Kolkata revealed surprising growth of mangroves on the Ganges river, said Pranabes Sanyal, the eastern India representative of the National Coastal Zone Management Authority (NCZMA). >> Read the Full Article
  • WWF opposes precarious ocean fertilization project

    Hamburg, Germany - A recent decision by the German government to give the go-ahead to a controversial large-scale ocean fertilization experiment (LOHAFEX) in international waters of the Southern Ocean has left WWF doubting Germany’s commitment to global agreements on the environment. Last year, the meeting of the parties to the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD) imposed a de facto moratorium on large-scale ocean fertilization experiments and commercial uses, only allowing for small-scale scientific research in coastal waters. >> Read the Full Article
  • Growing Optimism for U.S. Climate Change Bill

    A new Congress began less than one month ago, yet early indications suggest that 2009 may yield the most dramatic policy response to climate change in U.S. history. The challenge of passing domestic climate legislation before U.S. negotiators participate in global climate talks in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December remains difficult. Economic recession, a health care overhaul, and two foreign wars will compete with climate change for political attention. >> Read the Full Article
  • India: Policy for climate trust okayed

    The cabinet today approved a policy in principle for formation of a trust on climate change. A cabinet meeting with Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina at the cabinet division's conference room at the Secretariat approved the policy. >> Read the Full Article
  • Europe to feel the heat of climate change

    A CENTURY from now, Spain and Italy will be enduring baking, parched summers while residents of central and north-west Europe will be experiencing what we now think of as Mediterranean warmth. >> Read the Full Article
  • Gore to Lobby Lawmakers on Climate Change

    WASHINGTON (CNN) - Suggesting the planet will soon reach an irreversible "tipping point" of damage to the climate, former Vice President Al Gore plans to tell members of Congress on Wednesday that the U.S. needs to join international talks on a treaty. "This treaty must be negotiated this year," he plans to say, according to a copy of remarks prepared for testimony. >> Read the Full Article
  • Rising Acidity Threatens Oceans

    The oceans have long buffered the effects of climate change by absorbing a substantial portion of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. But this benefit has a catch: as the gas dissolves, it makes seawater more acidic. Now an international panel of marine scientists says this acidity is accelerating so fast it threatens the survival of coral reefs, shellfish and the marine food web generally. >> Read the Full Article
  • Australian heatwave sign of climate change

    SYDNEY (Reuters) - A heatwave scorching southern Australia, causing transport chaos by buckling rail lines and leaving more than 140,000 homes without power, is a sign of climate change, the government said on Thursday. >> Read the Full Article
  • Where warming hits hard

    Threatened with encroaching seas, dwindling water supplies and fiercer storms, Bangladesh is already suffering the ill effects of rising global greenhouse gas emissions. Mason Inman reports on how the region is coping with climate change. >> Read the Full Article
  • How Meat Contributes to Global Warming

    Most of us are aware that our cars, our coal-generated electric power and even our cement factories adversely affect the environment. Until recently, however, the foods we eat had gotten a pass in the discussion. Yet according to a 2006 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), our diets and, specifically, the meat in them cause more greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2), methane, nitrous oxide, and the like to spew into the atmosphere than either transportation or industry. (Greenhouse gases trap solar energy, thereby warming the earth's surface. Because gases vary in greenhouse potency, every greenhouse gas is usually expressed as an amount of CO2 with the same global-warming potential.) >> Read the Full Article